Emergency Department Visits for Drug Poisoning: United States, 2008–2011

April 9, 2015

Poisoning is the leading cause of injury-related mortality in the United States, with more than 40,000 deaths annually. Drugs account for 90% of poisoning deaths, and the number of deaths from drug poisoning has increased substantially in recent years. The emergency department (ED) plays an important role in the treatment of poisoning.

A new NCHS report describes nationally representative data on ED visits for drug poisoning during 2008–2011.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • During 2008–2011, an average of 1.1 million emergency department (ED) visits were made each year for drug poisoning, with a visit rate of 35.4 per 10,000 persons.
  • The ED visit rate for drug poisoning was highest among persons aged 20–34. The rate declined with age after 20–34, and rates for those aged 0–19 were similar to those aged 50 and over.
  • Drug-poisoning ED visit rates did not differ by sex and age, with the exception of persons aged 35–49, where females had a higher visit rate than males. The ED visit rate for unintentional drug poisoning was higher than self-inflicted drug poisoning overall and for males, but did not differ for females.
  • About one-quarter (24.5%) of drug-poisoning ED visits resulted in hospital admission.
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Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013

March 4, 2015

Drug poisoning (overdose) is the number one cause of injury-related death in the United States, with 43,982 deaths occurring in 2013. While much attention has been given to deaths involving opioid analgesics, in recent years there has been a steady increase in the number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin. A recent study using data from 28 states reported that the death rate for heroin overdose doubled from 2010 through 2012.

Using data from the National Vital Statistics System, a new NCHS report provides a description of trends and demographics for heroin-related drug-poisoning deaths in the United States from 2000 through 2013.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin nearly quadrupled from 0.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2013. Most of the increase occurred after 2010.
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin was nearly four times higher for men (6,525 deaths) than women (1,732 deaths) in 2013.
  • In 2000, non-Hispanic black persons aged 45–64 had the highest rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin (2.0 per 100,000). In 2013, non-Hispanic white persons aged 18–44 had the highest rate (7.0 per 100,000).
  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin increased for all regions of the country, with the greatest increase seen in the Midwest.

 


STATE VITALS: MISSISSIPPI

November 19, 2014

The state of Mississippi scores lower than the nation overall in drug poisoning deaths.

However,  Mississippi ranks higher than the entire U.S. in mortality for all ten leading causes of death, which include:  heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, stroke, accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, kidney disease, influenza/pneumonia and suicide.


QuickStats: Drug-Poisoning Death Rates by State

July 10, 2014

In 2011, age-adjusted rates for deaths from drug poisoning varied by state, ranging from 7.1 to 36.3 per 100,000 population. In 17 states, the age-adjusted drug-poisoning death rate was significantly higher than the overall U.S. rate of 13.2 deaths per 100,000 population. The five states with the highest poisoning death rates were West Virginia (36.3), New Mexico (26.3), Kentucky (25.0), Nevada (22.8), and Utah (19.5).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6326a7.htm