Mortality in the United States, 2013

January 5, 2015

NCHS released a report last week that presents 2013 U.S. final mortality data on deaths and death rates by demographic and medical characteristics. These data provide information on mortality patterns among U.S. residents by such variables as sex, race and ethnicity, and cause of death.

Information on mortality patterns is key to understanding changes in the health and well-being of the U.S. population. Life expectancy estimates, age-adjusted death rates by race and ethnicity and sex, 10 leading causes of death, and 10 leading causes of infant death were analyzed by comparing 2013 final data with 2012 final data. In 2013, a total of 2,596,993 resident deaths were registered in the United States.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Life expectancy for the U.S. population in 2013 was unchanged from 2012 at 78.8 years.
  • The age-adjusted death rate of 731.9 per 100,000 standard population did not change significantly from 2012.
  • The 10 leading causes in 2013 remained the same as in 2012, although unintentional injuries became the fourth leading cause, while stroke became the fifth. Age-adjusted death rates significantly decreased for 4 leading causes and increased for 2.
  • The infant mortality rate in 2013 of 596.1 infant deaths per 100,000 live births did not change significantly from the rate in 2012. The 10 leading causes of infant death in 2013 remained the same as in 2012, although maternal complications became the third leading cause, while Sudden infant death syndrome became the fourth.

 

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QuickStats: Infant Mortality Rates by Race and Hispanic Ethnicity of Mother — United States, 2000, 2005, and 2010

January 14, 2014

m6301qsfThe U.S. infant mortality rate plateaued during 2000–2005, then declined from 6.86 infant deaths per 1,000 live births in 2005 to 6.14 in 2010. Declines from 2005 to 2010 were largest for non-Hispanic black women (from 13.63 to 11.46), followed by non-Hispanic white (from 5.76 to 5.18) and Hispanic women (from 5.62 to 5.25). In 2000 and 2005, the non-Hispanic black infant mortality rates were 2.4 times the non-Hispanic white rates; however, the difference between the two rates has narrowed, and in 2010, the non-Hispanic black rate was 2.2 times the non-Hispanic white rate.