Women’s Contraception Reports

February 14, 2013

Two new reports released by the National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) give insight into the use and methods of contraception among women aged 15-44.

The first report, Use of Emergency Contraception Among Women Aged 15-44: United States, 2006-2010, focused on trends and variation in the use of emergency contraception and reasons for use among sexually experienced women. The data from the report found that young adult women aged 20-24, who were never married, Hispanic or or non-Hispanic white women that attended college were most likely to have ever used emergency contraception; about one in four had done so.

Some other key findings from the study include:

  • Most women who had ever used emergency contraception had done so one (59%) or twice (23%).
  • Almost 1 in 5 never-married women (19%), 1 in 7 cohabiting women (14%), and 1 in 20 currently or formerly married women (5.7%)  had ever used emergency contraception.
  • About one in two women reported using emergency contraception because of fear of method failure (45%), and about one in two reported use because they unprotected sex (49%).

Chart of the percentage of sexually experienced women using emergency contraception.

The second report, Contraceptive Methods Women Have Ever Used: United States, 1982-2010, highlighted the number of contraceptive methods women have used since 1982 and reasons for stopping use.  The report also followed trends among race, education, and religious affiliations.

Key findings from the report:

  • The percentage of sexually-experienced females who have used the pill has remained stable since 1995 (82%).
  • The percentage who’ve ever used Depo-Provera, a 3-month injectable contraceptive has increased from 4.5% of women in 1995 to 23% in 2006-2010.
  •  Ever-use of the contraceptive patch increased from about 1% in 2002 to 10% in 2006-2010.  The contraceptive ring had been used by 6.3% of women in 2006-2010.

chart2

Advertisements

January is cervical cancer awareness month…

January 6, 2010

Cervical cancer once was the leading cause of cancer death for women in the U.S., and although the cases and deaths of cervical cancer have decreased over the past 40 years due largely to regular Pap tests, the disease still was responsible for almost 4,000 deaths in 2006 (most recent data available). The rates vary somewhat, but not widely, by state. See how your area compares below.

Cervical death rates per 100,000 women, United States, 2006

For more information on cervical cancer, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/index.htm.

For more information on cancer mortality, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.


Breast cancer deaths – A state-by-state basis

October 28, 2009

Except for skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. It is the second most common cause of cancer death in white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and American Indian/Alaska Native women. However, in the United States, incidence of breast cancer has decreased significantly by 2.2% per year from 1999 to 2005 among women, and deaths from breast cancer have decreased significantly by 1.8% per year from 1998 to 2005 among women. However, age-adjusted death rates from breast cancer vary by state:

This map of the U.S. shows death rates for breast cancer by state.

For more trends and statistics by state, visit http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_states.htm.

For more breast cancer statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, visit http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/.


Women starting their families later in life

August 12, 2009

Did you know that in the United States, the average age of a mother at first birth has increased 3.6 years since 1970? Not only are U.S. women starting their families later in life, but the trend depends a great deal on a person’s race/ethnicity and where she lives. Also, the U.S. has a much lower average age at first birth than many developed countries. To read more about this, visit the new Data Brief from the National Center for Health statistics, “Delayed Childbearing: Women Are Having Their First Child Later in life.” Also, you can listen to the Statcast or ask questions of the author on this blog.