QuickStats: Prevalence of Untreated Dental Caries in Permanent Teeth Among Children and Adolescents Aged 6–19 Years, by Age Group

January 17, 2017

 

During 2011–2014, 13.3% of children and adolescents aged 6–19 years had untreated dental caries in their permanent teeth.

The percentage of children and adolescents with untreated dental caries increased with age: 6.1% among those aged 6–11 years, 14.5% among those aged 12–15 years, and 22.6% among those aged 16–19 years.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6601a11.htm


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20 Years or Older Who Ever Told A Doctor That They Had Trouble Sleeping, by Age Group and Sex

November 29, 2016

In 2013–2014, 28% of U.S. adults reported that they had told a doctor or other health professional that they had trouble sleeping.

A smaller percentage of adults aged 20–39 years (19.2%) reported having trouble sleeping compared with persons aged 40–59 years (32.8%) and 60 years or older (33.2%).

This pattern by age group was observed for both men and women, although larger percentages of women aged 40–59 years and ≥60 years reported trouble sleeping compared with men in those age groups.


Daily Water Intake Among U.S. Men and Women, 2009–2012

April 26, 2016

Water is an essential nutrient for life. Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations from 2004 set adequate levels for total water intake from all foods and liquids at 3.7 liters (125 ounces) for men and 2.7 liters (91 ounces) for women.

Consuming inadequate amounts of water increases the risk of dehydration, kidney stones, and poorer cognitive performance. Differences in water intake have been reported by age, race and Hispanic origin, and physical activity.

A new NCHS report provides updated estimates of mean daily total water intake for U.S. men and women aged 20 and over in 2009–2012.

Findings:

  • Among U.S. adults, men consumed an average of 3.46 liters (117 ounces) of water per day, and women consumed 2.75 liters (93 ounces) per day.
  • Men aged 60 and over consumed less water (2.92 liters) than men aged 20–39 (3.61 liters) and 40–59 (3.63 liters). Similarly, women aged 60 and over consumed less water (2.51 liters) than women aged 20–39 (2.78 liters) and 40–59 (2.9 liters).
  • Non-Hispanic white men and women consumed more water daily than non-Hispanic black and Hispanic men and women.
  • Water intake increased with physical activity level for both men and women.
  • Among men, 30% of total water consumed was plain water (with the remainder from other foods and liquids) compared with 34% for women.

Nut Consumption Among U.S. Youth, 2009–2012

March 14, 2016

Nut consumption has been associated with improved weight status, nutrient intake, and diet quality among youth. However, allergies to nuts among children may be increasing, which may lead to higher vigilance over nut exposure in schools and other public settings.

An NCHS report examines the percentage of youth consuming nuts, including seeds and nut butters, on a given day. In addition, the source of nuts consumed is examined (i.e., the percentages of nuts consumed as a single-item food and as part of other foods).

Findings:

  • During 2009–2012, 32.4% of youth consumed nuts (including seeds and nut butters) on a given day.
    A higher percentage of non-Hispanic white youth (37.6%) than non-Hispanic black (24.3%) or Hispanic (25.0%) youth consumed nuts.
  • Almost 44.0% of youth in households at or above 350% of the poverty level consumed nuts, compared with 25.4% of youth in households below 130% of the poverty level.
  • Slightly less than 40% of nuts were consumed as a single-item food and not as an ingredient in candy, breads, cakes, cookies, cereals, or other dishes.

Abnormal Cholesterol Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2011–2014

December 11, 2015

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death among adults in the United States.

To improve the cardiovascular health of the U.S. population, clinical practice guidelines recommend screening children and adolescents for risk factors associated with CVD, including abnormal blood cholesterol levels.

An NCHS report provides 2011–2014 estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey on the prevalence of high total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and high non-HDL cholesterol among children and adolescents aged 6–19.

Findings:

  • One in five youths had high total cholesterol, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, or high non-HDL cholesterol.
  • Prevalence of low HDL cholesterol (13.4%) was greater than high non-HDL cholesterol (8.4%) or high total cholesterol (7.4%).
  • Prevalence of high total cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, and high non-HDL cholesterol was greater in adolescents than children.
  • Girls had higher prevalence than boys for high total cholesterol and high non-HDL cholesterol, but lower prevalence for low HDL cholesterol.
  • Youth with obesity had greater prevalence of high total cholesterol, low HDL cholesterol, and high non-HDL cholesterol than youth of normal weight.

 


Total and High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Adults: United States, 2011–2014

December 1, 2015

High levels of total cholesterol and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (the “good cholesterol”) are risk factors for coronary heart disease. During 2009–2010, 13.4% of adults had high total cholesterol and 21.3% had low HDL cholesterol.

An NCHS report presents estimates of the percentage of adults with high total and low HDL cholesterol during 2011–2014, and trends in prevalence of high total and low HDL cholesterol from 2007–2008 to 2013–2014. Analysis is based on measured cholesterol only and does not account for cholesterol-lowering medication use.

Findings:

  • During 2011–2014, 12.1% of adults had high total cholesterol and 18.5% had low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol.
  • The prevalence of high total cholesterol was lower in non-Hispanic black men than in non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic men, and lower in non-Hispanic black women than in non-Hispanic white and Hispanic women.
  • Low HDL cholesterol prevalence was lower in non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic Asian men and women than in Hispanic men and women; in non-Hispanic black men and women than in non-Hispanic white men and women; and in non-Hispanic Asian women than in non-Hispanic white women.
  • From 2007 to 2014, the percentage of adults with high total and low HDL cholesterol declined.

Viral Hepatitis Among Asian Adults in the United States, 2011–2014

November 19, 2015

Hepatitis A (HAV), B (HBV), and C (HCV) viruses are common types of viral hepatitis. HBV and HCV infection can lead to liver disease, cancer, and serious health consequences. HAV and HBV infections are high among Asian persons, especially those born outside the United States.

An NCHS report provides 2011–2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimates on prevalence of antibody to HAV (from infection or immunization), past or current HBV infection, and current HCV infection, by race and Hispanic origin.

Key Findings:

  • Prevalence of antibody to HAV from infection or vaccination was higher among non-Hispanic Asian adults than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black adults.
  • Prevalence of both past or current HBV infection as well as just current active HBV infection was higher among non-Hispanic Asian adults than non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic adults.
  • Prevalence of current HCV virus infection among non-Hispanic Asian adults was lower than the other race and Hispanic groups.
  • Prevalence of antibody to HAV from infection or vaccination was greater among non-Hispanic Asian adults born outside the United States than those who were U.S.-born. A similar pattern was seen for past or current HBV infection.