QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20 Years or Older Who Had Taken Any Dietary Supplement† in the Past 30 Days, by Sex and Family Income

January 8, 2021

During 2017–2018, 57.6% of adults aged ≥20 years had taken a dietary supplement within the past 30 days.

The percentage increased with family income: 44.9% among those with family incomes <130% of the FPL, 56.2% among those with family incomes 130%–349% of the federal poverty level (FPL), and 65.7% among those with family incomes ≥350% of the FPL.

The increase with family income was seen for both men and women.

Women were more likely than were men to use a dietary supplement overall (63.8% versus 50.8%) and at each income level.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2017–2018. https://wwwn.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/search/datapage.aspx?Component=Dietary&CycleBeginYear=2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7001a7.htm


Q & A Podcast with Author of Special Diets Among Adults Report

November 6, 2020

NCHS has a new podcast interview with Bryan Stierman, an epidemic intelligence officer with the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics. Dr. Stierman works with the NCHS National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, or NHANES, and he is the lead author on a  study on Special Diets among American adults that was released on November 3, 2020.

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/podcasts/20201106/20201106.htm


Special Diets Among Adults: United States, 2015–2018

November 3, 2020

A new NCHS report  released today shows the percentage of U.S. adults who, on a given day, were on any special diet and specific types of special diets in 2015–2018 and trends from 2007–2008 through 2017–2018.

Key Findings: 

  • In 2015–2018, 17.1% of U.S. adults aged 20 and over were on a special diet on a given day.
  • More women were on a special diet than men, and more adults aged 40–59 and 60 and over were on a special diet than adults aged 20–39.
  • More non-Hispanic white adults (17.8%) were on a special diet than non-Hispanic black (14.7%) and non-Hispanic Asian (14.9%) adults.
  • The most common type of special diet reported among all adults was a weight loss or low-calorie diet.
  • From 2007–2008 through 2017–2018, the percentage of adults on any special diet, weight loss or low-calorie diets, and low carbohydrate diets increased, while the percentage of adults on low-fat or low-cholesterol diets decreased.

Abnormal Lipid Levels, Diagnosed High Cholesterol, and Lipid-lowering Treatment Among Adults: Los Angeles County and the United States, 1999–2014

October 27, 2020

A new NCHS Health E-Stat looks at the percentage of adults diagnosed with high cholesterol and, among those with diagnosed high cholesterol, those taking lipid-lowering medications and statins among adults in LA County and the United States during 1999–2006 and 2007–2014 .

Click to access Health-E-stat_lipidlevels-h.pdf


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20 Years or Older Who Used Antidepressant Medications in the Past 30 Days by Sex and Marital Status

October 23, 2020

During 2015–2018, 13.6% of adults aged 20 years or older used prescription antidepressant medications in the past 30 days.

Antidepressant use was higher among divorced, separated, or widowed (20.5%) adults than among either married or living with partner (12.3%) or never married (10.8%) adults.

There was no difference in use between married and never married adults.

These same patterns were observed for both men and women. Within every marital status category, a higher percentage of women compared with men took antidepressants.

Source: Brody DJ, Gu Q. Antidepressant use among adults: United States, 2015–2018. NCHS Data Brief, no 377. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2020.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6942a8.htm


Breakfast Intake Among Children and Adolescents: United States, 2015–2018

October 14, 2020

Questions for Ana Terry, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Breakfast Intake Among Children and Adolescents: United States, 2015–2018.”

Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

AT: It was interesting to see that the percentage of breakfast intake among adolescents was more than 20 percentage points lower than younger children: 73% of adolescents aged 12-19 and 96% of children aged 2-5 years old consumed breakfast.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AT: We assessed data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, in which survey participants were asked to report all foods and beverages they consumed in the previous 24 hours, from midnight to midnight. We looked at children and adolescents, aged 2-19 years who reported eating “breakfast” (or “desayuno”).


Q: Is there any trend data that goes back further than 2009-2010?

AT: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey has been collecting diet intake information since 1971, for almost 50 years. We focused on breakfast consumption in the past 10 years for this report.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

AT: Overall, we found that from 2015 to 2018, 82% of children and adolescents consumed breakfast on a given day; breakfast consumption decreased with age and was higher among children & adolescents from families with higher incomes; a lower percentage of non-Hispanic black children and adolescents consumed breakfast; and that milk, cereal, and water were the most commonly reported foods or beverages. The percentage of children and adolescents who consumed breakfast did not change in the past 10 years.


Q: Is there data on lunch and dinner?

AT: Yes, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is the source of the data, conducts a 24-hour dietary recall, by which we gather information on all foods and beverages consumed by the participant in the previous 24 hours. Diet intake data is available for researchers to assess which meals and snacks were reported, the time of the day for each meal or snack, and the foods and beverages that were consumed. For this data brief, we focused on breakfast consumption from 2015 to 2018.


QuickStats: Prevalence of Complete Tooth Loss Among Adults Aged 65 Years or Older by Federal Poverty Level — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, United States, 1999–2018

September 18, 2020

The age-adjusted prevalence of complete tooth loss among adults aged 65 years or older decreased from 29.3% during 1999–2000 to 12.6% during 2017–2018.

For the same period, the prevalence decreased from 42.1% to 23.5% for adults living at less than 200% of the federal poverty level and from 17.7% to 8.5% for adults living at more than 200% of the federal poverty level.

Throughout the period, the prevalence of complete tooth loss was higher among those living at less than 200% of the federal poverty level.

Sources: Fleming E, Afful J, Griffin SO. Prevalence of tooth loss among older adults: United States, 2015–2018. NCHS data brief, no. 368. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db368.htm. National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6937a8.htm


QuickStats: Prevalence of Past or Present Infection with Hepatitis B Virus Among Adults Aged 18 Years or Older, by Race and Hispanic Origin — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2018

September 4, 2020

The prevalence of past or present infection with hepatitis B virus among adults aged 18 years or older declined from 5.7% in 1999–2002 to 4.3% in 2015–2018.

A decline among non-Hispanic White (3.5% to 2.1%), non-Hispanic Black (15.6% to 10.8%), and Mexican American (3.5% to 1.8%) adults also occurred over the same period.

Prevalence was higher among non-Hispanic Black adults than among both non-Hispanic White and Mexican American adults for all periods.

Sources: Kruszon-Moran D, Paulose-Ram R, Martin CB, Barker L, McQuillan G. Prevalence and trends in hepatitis B virus infection in the United States, 2015–2018. NCHS Data Brief, no 361. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db361.htm; National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2002 to 2015-2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/index.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6935a8.htm


Nonalcoholic Beverage Consumption Among Adults: United States, 2015–2018

September 3, 2020

Questions for Crescent Martin, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Nonalcoholic Beverage Consumption Among Adults: United States, 2015–2018.”

Q: Why did you decide to look at non-alcoholic beverage consumption for this report?

CM: Beverages help meet total water intake needs, and also are a major contributor to overall nutrient and caloric intake in the United States.

A previous analysis had looked at beverage consumption among youth (2013-2016), decided to conduct a similar analysis for adults.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

CM: Water contributed substantially more to total non-alcoholic beverages consumption in grams, compared to other beverages.

Men consumed a lower percentage of their total beverages as water and tea, compared to women.

The contribution of coffee to total beverage consumption increased with age


Q: How did the data vary by different beverage types to total non-alcoholic beverage consumption among adults?

CM: By sex: Men consumed a lower percentage of their total beverages as water and tea, compared to women.

Men consumed a higher percentage of their total beverage intake as: coffee, sweetened beverages, fruit beverages, compared to women.

By age: The contributions of several beverages to total beverage consumption decreased with age: water, sweetened beverages, fruit beverages.

Others increased with age: coffee, tea, milk, diet beverages

By race and Hispanic origin:

For non-Hispanic Asian adults: water and tea contributed a higher percentage, sweetened beverages a lower percentage compared to other groups

For non-Hispanic white adults: coffee and diet beverages both contributed a higher percentage than for other groups

For non-Hispanic black and Hispanic adults: sweetened beverages were higher than for NH Asian and NH white adults

For Non-Hispanic black adults: fruit beverages higher than for other groups


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

CM: Water accounted for over half (51.2%) of total non-alcoholic beverage consumption on a given day for US adults in 2015–2018.

Next highest: coffee (14.9%); Sweetened beverages (10.2%); Tea (8.7%)


Q: Does NHANES or NCHS have any data on alcoholic beverage consumption?

CM: An NHANES report from 2012: Calories Consumed From Alcoholic Beverages by U.S. Adults, 2007–2010. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db110.htm

Main findings – Men and younger adults consume more calories from alcoholic beverages. And men consume more beer than other types of alcohol.

Alcohol use (not calories) is also reported using the National Health Interview Survey


Fast Food Intake Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2015–2018

August 14, 2020

Questions for Cheryl Fryar, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Fast Food Intake Among Children and Adolescents in the United States, 2015–2018.”

Q: Why does NCHS conduct studies on fast food consumption among children and adolescents?

CF: We focus on fast food for this report because fast food continues to play an important role in the American diet. Fast food has been associated with poor diet and increased risk of obesity. In a previous report, we described the percentage of calories consumed from fast food among children and adolescents during 201-2012. This report provides an update on the daily percentage of calories consumed from fast food by children and adolescents aged 2-19 years during 2015-2018 and trends since 2003.


Q: How did the data vary by age groups, sex and race?

CF: There were some demographic differences in the daily percentage of calories consumed from fast food. Adolescents aged 12–19 consumed a higher percentage of calories (16.7%) from fast food than younger children (11.4%) aged 2-11 years. Girls consumed a higher percentage than boys and non-Hispanic white adolescents consumed a lower percentage than the other race and Hispanic origin groups. This brief report did not examine confounders that may possibly explain demographic differences.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

CF: While there really wasn’t anything in this report that I hadn’t expected to see or that was surprising to me, this report’s trends analysis is of interest. The daily percentage of calories from fast food in children and adolescents decreased from 14.1% in 2003–2004 to 10.6% in 2009–2010, and then increased to 14.4% in 2017-2018.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

CF: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is the source of the data.  Since 1999, NHANES has been conducted on a continuous basis, and visits approximately 15 counties each year of various population size.  The survey conducts at home health interviews and health examinations in mobile examination centers (MEC) with nearly 5000 people each year.   Information on nutrient intake was obtained from one 24-hour dietary recall interview administered in-person at the MEC.  Specifically, anyone who reported obtaining any food or beverage from “restaurant fast food/pizza” was someone who consumed fast food on a given day.  Dietary recalls cover intake for any given day, specifically the 24-hour period prior to the dietary recall interview (midnight to midnight).

For survey participants < 6 years of age a proxy was used (who was generally the person most knowledgeable about the child’s food intake). For children ages 6- 8, interviews were conducted with a proxy and with the child present to assist in reporting intake information. Interviews of children ages 9-11, were conducted with the child and the assistance of an adult familiar with the child’s intake. Adolescents 12 years or older answered for themselves.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

CF: The take-home message for this report is that more than one-third (36.3%) of U.S. children and adolescents consume fast food on a given day. Overall, children and adolescents consume, on average, 13.8% of their daily calories from fast food.  And, on a given day, over 11% of children and adolescents consume more than 45% of their daily calories from fast food.

Diet and exercise play important roles in helping individuals achieve and maintain their health.  The USDA/HHS’ Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 provides guidance in healthy food choices.  In addition, HHS’ 2018 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans provides guidance for all ages in improving health through physical activity.