QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18–64 Years Who Had an Influenza Vaccination† in the Past 12 Months, by Sex and Current Asthma Status

January 18, 2019

In 2017, adults aged 18–64 years with current asthma were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months (47.9%) than those without asthma (36.4%).

Regardless of asthma status, women were more likely than men to have had an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.

Women aged 18–64 years with current asthma (51.3%) were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination than men with current asthma in this age group (41.6%).

Among adults aged 18–64 years without asthma, women also were more likely to have had an influenza vaccination (40.0%) than were men (32.8%).

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6802a7.htm

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Updated Provisional Drug Overdose Death Data: 12-Month Ending from June 2017-June 2018

January 16, 2019

Link: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Deaths from Cancer of the Cervix Uteri, 1999-2017

January 14, 2019

cerv_canc

SOURCE:  CDC WONDER, ICD-10 codes:  C53.0, C53.1, C53.8, C53.9


QuickStats: Percentage of Emergency Department Visits Made by Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Among Persons Aged 18 Years or Older, by Race/Ethnicity and Sex

January 11, 2019

During 2015–2016, 3.5% of adult visits to the emergency department were made by those with chronic kidney disease.

A higher percentage of visits were made by men with chronic kidney disease than women (4.1% compared with 2.7%).

The same pattern was observed for non-Hispanic black men (5.0%) and women (2.4%).

Although the pattern was similar, there was no statistically significant difference in emergency department visits by sex for Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults.

SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics, National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015–2016.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6801a7.htm


Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017

January 10, 2019

Questions for Brady E. Hamilton, Ph.D., Demographer, Statistician, and Lead Author of “Total Fertility Rates by State and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017”

Q: Why did you decide to do a report on the total fertility rate in the United States?

BH: We produced this report because we were interested in what differences there were in the total fertility rate (TFR) by state and population group (race and Hispanic origin). This report presents the TFR for each state in 2017, both overall and for the three largest population groups — non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic. As noted in the report, fertility levels affect the size and composition of the population, and family size is associated with female labor force participation and economic growth, as well as other social and economic changes.


Q: Can you explain what the total fertility rate is and how is it different from the general fertility rate and crude birth rate?

BH: The total fertility rate is the number of births expected for a (hypothetical) group of 1,000 women over their lifetime, assuming the current age-specific birth rate hold. The crude birth rate and general fertility rate measure the number of births occurring for either the whole population or the population of women in their childbearing years (ages 15-44 year) in a given year. The TFR, on the other hand, estimates the number of births for women over a generation. For that reason, the TFR can be used to ascertain whether the number of births is at “replacement,” that is, the level at which a given group of women can exactly replace themselves (generally considered to be 2,100 births per 1,000 women for the TFR).


Q: How did total fertility rates vary by state and race in 2017?

BH: Differences in the total fertility rates among the states by race and Hispanic origin were considerable. For non-Hispanic white women, the TFR for Utah (2,099.5, the highest) was more than double the TFR for the District of Columbia (1,012.0, the lowest). For non-Hispanic black women, the TFR for Maine (4,003.5) was 3.5 times higher than that for Wyoming (1,146.0). For Hispanic women, the TFR for Alabama (3,085.0) was 2.6 times higher than the TFR for Vermont (1,200.5). In addition, there were no states with TFRs above replacement for non-Hispanic white women in 2017. However, for non-Hispanic black women, the TFRs for 12 states was above replacement. The TFRs for Hispanic women were above replacement in 29 states.


Q: Do you have trend data on total fertility rates that goes back 10 or 20 years?

BH: The report includes only data for 2017. However, trend data for the total fertility rate at the national level, by race and Hispanic origin group, are available from Births: Final Data for 2017 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr67/nvsr67_08-508.pdf), Births: Final Data for 2015 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_01.pdf), and Trends and Variations in Reproduction and Intrinsic Rates: United States, 1990-2014 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr66/nvsr66_02.pdf). In general, the TFR has declined over the last six decades, with the TFR being below replacement for all but two years (2006 and 2007) since 1971. In 2017, the rates for all groups were below replacement.


Q: Is there a finding in this report that surprised you?

BH: The range between the highest and lowest total fertility rate among the states by race and Hispanic origin groups is noteworthy. As we mentioned, for non-Hispanic white women, the TFR for Utah was more than double the TFR for the District of Columbia. For non-Hispanic black women, the TFR for Maine was 3.5 times higher than that for Wyoming. For Hispanic women, the TFR for Alabama was 2.6 times higher than the TFR for Vermont.


Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–49: United States, 2015–2017

December 19, 2018

Using data from the 2015–2017 National Survey of Family Growth, a new NCHS report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status, in the month of interview, among women aged 15–49 in the United States.

In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and education, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: female sterilization; oral contraceptive pill; long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices; and male condom.

Key Findings:

  • In 2015–2017, 64.9% of the 72.2 million women aged 15–49 in the United States were currently using contraception. The most common contraceptive methods currently used were female sterilization (18.6%), oral contraceptive pill (12.6%), long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) (10.3%), and male condom (8.7%).
  • Use of LARCs was higher among women aged 20–29 (13.1%) compared with women aged 15–19 (8.2%) and 40–49 (6.7%); use was also higher among women aged 30–39 (11.7%) compared with those aged 40–49.
  • Current condom use did not differ among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic women (about 7%–10%).
  • Female sterilization declined and use of the pill increased with higher education. Use of LARCs did not differ across education (about 10%–12%).

Drugs Most Frequently Involved in Drug Overdose Deaths: United States, 2011–2016

December 12, 2018

Questions for Lead Author Holly Hedegaard, M.D., M.S.P.H., Health Statistician, and author of “Drugs Most Frequently Involved in Drug Overdose Deaths: United States, 2011–2016.”

Q: Is there a specific finding in this report that surprised you?

HH: During the six years of the study, the relative ranking of the drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths changed. In 2011, the drug most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths was oxycodone, in 2012-2015 was heroin and in 2016 was fentanyl. In 2016, fentanyl was involved in nearly 30% of the drug overdose deaths in the United States.

The drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths also varied by the intent of the death. In 2016, the drugs most frequently involved in unintentional (accidental) drug overdose deaths were fentanyl, heroin and cocaine, while the drugs most frequently mentioned in suicides by drug overdose were oxycodone, diphenhydramine, hydrocodone, and alprazolam.


Q: How is the data in this report different from the recently released drug overdose data brief and provisional drug overdose numbers produced by NCHS?

HH: The drug overdose data brief and the provisional drug overdose numbers produced by NCHS involve analysis of death certificate data coded using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). One limitation of this classification system is that, with a few exceptions, ICD–10 codes reflect broad categories of drugs rather than unique specific drugs.

In the National Vital Statistics Report, NCHS uses data from the literal text on death certificates to identify the specific drugs involved in the death. Using this method, we can look at the number of deaths involving specific drugs, such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, or fentanyl, for example, rather than be limited to the broader categories found with ICD-10 coded data, such as natural and semi-synthetic opioids or synthetic opioids other than methadone.


Q: What did your report find on the percentage of drug overdose deaths mentioning at least one specific drug or substance?

HH: Using the literal text to identify the specific drugs involved is dependent on whether or not the specific drugs are reported on the death certificate. The specificity of reporting has improved in recent years. In 2011, the specific drugs or drug classes involved were reported for 78% of drug overdose deaths; in 2016, the reporting increased to nearly 88% of drug overdose deaths.


Q: Do you have data that goes further back than 2011?

HH:  A previous report looked at the drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths in 2010-2014. That report is available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr65/nvsr65_10.pdf


Q: Do you have data on drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths that goes up to 2017?  If not, when do you expect that will be available?

NCHS does not currently have information on the drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths in 2017. NCHS is currently preparing the data files for analysis. The results for 2017 will be available in 2019.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

HH: The patterns in the specific drugs most frequently involved in drug overdose deaths can change from year to year. Complete and accurate reporting in the literal text on death certificates of the specific drugs involved provides critical information needed for understanding and preventing drug overdose deaths.