QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Rates of Suicide, by State — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2017

September 13, 2019

In 2017, the U.S. age-adjusted suicide rate was 14.0 per 100,000 population, but rates varied by state.

The five states with the highest rates were Montana (28.9 deaths per 100,000 population), Alaska (27.0), Wyoming (26.9), New Mexico (23.3), and Idaho (23.2).

The five with the lowest rates were the District of Columbia (6.6), New York (8.1), New Jersey (8.3), Massachusetts (9.5), and Maryland (9.8).

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System. Mortality Data, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6836a5.htm

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Updated Provisional Drug Overdose Death Data: 12-Month Ending from February 2018- February 2019

September 11, 2019

Link: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Death Rates for Parkinson Disease Among Adults Aged 65 Years or Older

September 6, 2019

From 1999 to 2017, age-adjusted death rates for Parkinson disease among adults aged 65 years or older increased from 41.7 to 65.3 per 100,000 population.

Among men, the age-adjusted death rate increased from 65.2 per 100,000 in 1999 to 97.9 in 2017.

Among women, the rate increased from 28.4 per 100,000 in 1999 to 43.0 in 2017. Throughout 1999–2017, the death rates for Parkinson disease for men were higher than those for women.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data 1999–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data_access/vitalstatsonline.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6835a6.htm


Mortality Patterns Between Five States With Highest Death Rates and Five States With Lowest Death Rates: United States, 2017

September 5, 2019

Mortality in the United States varies widely by state . A new NCHS report compares average age-adjusted death rates by sex, race and ethnicity, and five leading causes of death between a group of five states with the highest age-adjusted death rates (Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and West Virginia) and a group of five states with the lowest age-adjusted death rates (California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, and New York) in 2017.

Key Findings:

  • The average age-adjusted death rate for the five states with the highest rates (926.8 per 100,000 standard population) was 49% higher than the rate for the five states with the lowest rates (624.0).
  • Age-specific death rates for all age groups were higher for the states with the highest rates compared with the states with the lowest rates.
  • Age-adjusted death rates were higher for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations but lower for the Hispanic population in states with the highest rates than in states with the lowest rates.
  • The age-adjusted death rates for chronic lower respiratory diseases and unintentional injuries for the states with the highest rates (62.0 and 65.5, respectively) were almost doubled compared with the states with the lowest rates (31.0 and 35.8).

QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Who Have Paid Sick Leave, by Industry — National Health Interview Survey, 2009 and 2018

August 30, 2019

The percentage of all currently employed workers with access to paid sick leave increased from 57.8% in 2009 to 62.4% in 2018.

By industry, the percentage increased for workers in construction (32.7% to 43.9%), wholesale & retail trade (48.3% to 53.1%), services (56.7% to 60.8%), and manufacturing (60.7% to 65.5%).

In 2018, fewer than half of workers in agriculture, forestry, and fishing and construction industries had access to paid sick leave compared to approximately 90% of workers in public administration.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2009–2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.


QuickStats: Rate of Alcohol-Induced Deaths Among Persons Aged 25 Years or Older, by Age Group

August 26, 2019

Rates of alcohol-induced deaths for persons aged 45–64 years increased from 17.3 per 100,000 population in 1999 to 26.0 in 2017.

For persons aged 25–44 years, rates declined from 1999 to 2005, were stable from 2005 to 2012, and then increased from 2012 (4.8) to 2017 (6.3).

A similar pattern was observed for persons aged ≥65 years, with an initial decline, a stable period, and then an increase from 2011 (12.0) to 2017 (16.4).

Source: National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data, 1999–2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6833a5.htm


Strategies Used by Adults With Diagnosed Diabetes to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017–2018

August 21, 2019

Questions for Robin Cohen, Ph.D. and Lead Author of ”Strategies Used by Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes to Reduce Their Prescription Drug Costs, 2017-2018.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in your report?

RC: Among adults with diagnosed diabetes, more than 13 percent did not take their medication as prescribed to save money and almost 1 in 4 asked their doctor for a lower cost medication.


Q: Do you have other data that would put these diabetes findings in context with other diseases?

RC: We have not looked at strategies adults use to reduce their prescription for other diseases. However, two previously published reports examined strategies used by adults aged 18-64 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db333.htm) and by adults aged 65 and over (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/databriefs/db335.htm) to reduce their prescription drug costs in 2016-2017.


Q: Do you have any data on this topic for earlier years?

RC: We do not have reports addressing strategies used by adults with diagnosed diabetes for earlier years. However, two previous reports examined strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription drug costs in 2011 and 2013.


Q: Which age group or demographic group seems to be having the biggest problem with the cost of diabetes medication or with taking their medication?

RC: Among U.S. adults with diagnosed diabetes who were prescribed medication in the past 12 months, the percentages of adults who did not take their medication as prescribed to reduce their prescription drug costs were highest among women and adults under age 65.  Among adults aged 18-64, those who were uninsured (35.7%) were more than twice as likely than those with either private (14.0%) or Medicaid (17.8%) coverage to not take their medication as prescribed to save money.


Q: Any other significant points you’d like to make about your report?

RC: Among adults aged 18-64, those who were uninsured (35.7%) were more than twice as likely than those with either private (14.0%) or Medicaid (17.8%) coverage to not take their medication as prescribed to save money.