QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 18–64 Years Who Had Seen or Talked to a Health Care Professional in the Past 12 Months by Race/Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, 2012–2013 and 2017–2018

December 6, 2019

The percentage of adults aged 18–64 years who had seen or talked to a health care professional in the past 12 months increased from 79.3% in 2012–2013 to 82.1% in 2017–2018.

There was an increase in the percentage of Hispanic (67.0% to 73.6%), non-Hispanic white (82.8% to 84.9%), non-Hispanic black (80.0% to 83.2%), and non-Hispanic Asian (75.8% to 78.8%) adults who had seen or talked to a health care professional in the past 12 months between those two periods.

During 2012–2013 as well as 2017–2018, non-Hispanic white adults were the most likely and Hispanic adults were the least likely to have seen or talked to a health care professional in the past 12 months.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2012, 2013, 2017, and 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6848a3.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Who Had Ever Used an E-cigarette by Race and Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2014 and 2018

November 29, 2019

From 2014 to 2018, the percentage of all U.S. adults aged 18 years or older who had ever used an e-cigarette increased from 13.0% to 15.7% overall and, by race/ethnicity, increased among non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, non-Hispanic Asian, and Hispanic adults.

Non-Hispanic white adults were the most likely, in both years, to have ever used an e-cigarette. In 2018, 19.1% of non-Hispanic white adults had ever used an e-cigarette, compared with 10.1% of non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic Asians and 10.2% of Hispanics.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Health Interview Survey, 2014 and 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6847a4.htm


Births: Final Data for 2018

November 27, 2019

Questions for Joyce Martin, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Births: Final Data for 2018

Q: What is new in this report from the 2018 provisional birth report?

JM: In addition to providing final numbers and rates for numerous birth characteristics such as fertility rates, teen childbearing, cesarean delivery and preterm and low birthweight, this report presents final information on  teen childbearing by race and Hispanic origin and by state, births to unmarried women, tobacco use during pregnancy, source of payment for the delivery and twin and triplet childbearing.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the 2018 final birth data that surprised you?

JM: The continued decline in birth rates to unmarried women (down 2% for 2017-2018 to 40.1 births per 1,000 unmarried women), the fairly steep decline in tobacco smoking among pregnant women (down 6% to 6.5% of all women) and the continued declines in twin (down 2%) and triplet (down 8%) birth rates.  Also of note is the decline in the percentage of births covered by Medicaid between 2017 and 2018 (down 2% to 42.3%) and the small rise in the percentage covered by private insurance (49.6% in 2018).


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

JM: These data are based on information for all birth certificates registered in the United States for 2018.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

JM: Birth certificate data provide a wealth of important current and trend information on demographic and maternal and infant health characteristics for the United States.


Q: Why do you think the birth has dropped in the U.S.?

JM: The factors associated with family formation and childbearing are numerous and complex, involving psychological, cultural, demographic, and socio-economic influences. The data on which the report is based come from all birth certificates registered in the U.S. While the data provide a wealth of information on topics such as the number of births occurring in small areas, to small population groups, and for rare health outcomes, the data do not provide information on the attitudes and behavior of the parents regarding family formation and childbearing. Accordingly, the data in and of itself cannot answer the question of why births have dropped in the U.S.


QuickStats: Percentage of Currently Employed Adults Aged 18–64 Years Who Have Paid Sick Leave by Poverty Status — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2008 and 2018

November 22, 2019

In 2017, 91.6% of adults aged ≥25 years easily understood information from their health care providers most or all of the time.

The percentage of adults who easily understood health care information most or all of the time increased as education level increased.

Adults who had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher were the most likely to understand their health care providers at least most of the time (93.9%), whereas those without a high school diploma were the least likely (85.2%).

Men (91.0%) were somewhat less likely than women (92.1%) to have easily understood information from providers most or all of the time.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2008 and 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis/index.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6846a6.htm


Vision testing among children aged 3-5 years in the United States, 2016-2017

November 20, 2019

Questions for Lindsey Black, M.P.H., Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Vision testing among children aged 3-5 years in the United States, 2016-2017

Q: Why did you decide to focus on vision testing for children aged 3-5?

LB: Over a quarter of all children aged 0-17 years have vision problems (1). Two common eye problems, amblyopia (lazy eye) and strabismus (crossed eyes) can be treated and prevent further vision problems if they are found early (2). The USPSTF recommends children between 3-5 years old have vision screening (3) and Healthy People 2020 target for vision screening is 44.1% of preschool aged children (1). Despite this, little is known about the current prevalence of vision screening and how this may differ by population subgroups. We focused on children 3-5 years old as they are the focus of the USPSTF recommendations.

  1. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Healthy People 2020. Washington, DC. Accessed at : https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/vision/objectives
  2. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Get your child’s vision checked. Washington DC. Accessed at: https://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/doctor-visits/screening-tests/get-your-childs-vision-checked
  3. US Preventive Services Task Force. Vision Screening for Children 1 to 5 Years of Age: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Pediatrics 127, 2 p340

Q: How did the data vary by age, race and health insurance?

LB: Overall, as children aged, they were more likely to have ever had their vision tested. Additionally, as children aged, they were also more likely to have had their vision tested in the past 12 months. There was also variation by race and Hispanic origin. About 65% of Non-Hispanic white children, 63% of non-Hispanic black children and 59% of Hispanic children have ever had their vision tested. Children with private health insurance (66.7%) were most likely to have ever had their vision tested compared with children with public insurance (61.2%) and children who are uninsured (43.3%).


Q: Was there a specific finding in your report that surprised you?

LB: It was surprising how much of an impact a recent well-child visit had on ever having a vision test. Children who did not receive a well-child visit in the past 12 months (44.1%) were less likely to have ever had their vision tested when compared to children that had received a well-child visit in the past 12 months (65.9%). Since vision screenings are recommended to be part of well-child visits, these visits provide valuable opportunities to detect problems and offer intervention efforts.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

LB: Data are from the pooled 2016-2017 National Health Interview Survey and can be accessed via: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm. Questions on vision testing are from supplement questions, which focused on expanded content related to child vision. This supplement was asked most recently in 2016-2017.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

LB: Approximately 64% of children aged 3-5 have ever had their vision tested by a doctor or other health professional. As children age, they are more likely to have had their vision tested. Disparities exist by race, and health insurance status. Receipt of a recent well-child visit was also associated with a higher prevalence of receiving a vision test.

 


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 25 Years or Older Who Had Seen a Health Care Professional in the Past 12 Months and Who Easily Understood Information from Their Health Care Providers Most or All of the Time by Sex and Education Level

November 15, 2019

In 2017, 91.6% of adults aged 25 years or older easily understood information from their health care providers most or all of the time.

The percentage of adults who easily understood health care information most or all of the time increased as education level increased.

Adults who had completed a bachelor’s degree or higher were the most likely to understand their health care providers at least most of the time (93.9%), whereas those without a high school diploma were the least likely (85.2%).

Men (91.0%) were somewhat less likely than women (92.1%) to have easily understood information from providers most or all of the time.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6845a6.htm


Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016

November 15, 2019

Questions for Lead Author Anna Rui, Health Statistician, of “Emergency Department Visits for Injuries Sustained During Sports and Recreational Activities by Patients Aged 5–24 Years, 2010–2016.”

Q: What do you think is the most significant finding in this report?

AR: The top activities that caused emergency room (ER) visits for sports injuries by patients ages 5-24 years were football, basketball, pedal cycling, and soccer. There was wide variation by age and sex in the types of activities causing ER visits for sports injuries.


Q: Out of all of the sports, which sport or activity was found to have the largest increase in ER visits over time?

AR: We did not assess trends over time in the report.


Q: Is it accurate to say that the sports in the study are the most dangerous? Or do they have the most ER visits because they are simply the most popular?

AR: There are likely other health care utilization measures besides ER visits that others would want to look at as well, but the purpose of the report was to estimate the number of ER visits for sports injuries, and these are the sports that account for the most visits.


Q: What are some limitations of the report?

AR: The definition of sports and recreational activities relied on data processing and manual review of medical records, which could have resulted in over- or under-estimation of the sports injury ER rate. The study did not include patients who sought care in other settings or who did not seek care; thus the estimates in the report are an underestimate of all health care utilization for sports injuries.


Q: Why is this report important?

AR: Many young Americans engage in some type of sports or recreational activity each year, and sports and recreation-related injuries are a common type of injury seen in hospital ERs. It’s important to understand the types of injuries that are most commonly seen in the ER and which sports account for those injuries in order to monitor and guide injury prevention efforts. In addition, we provide updated estimates of treatments administered in the ER for sports injuries, which provides new information that can be used to monitor improvements to the quality and value of care and serve as a benchmark for future studies.