3 out of 4 Flu & Pneumonia Deaths Occur Among Seniors Age 75+

March 11, 2020

FLU_DEATHS_AGEOver the past 20 years (1999-2018), there were nearly one million deaths in the U.S. from influenza and pneumonia among Americans age 65 and over – accounting for 86% of all deaths from the illness over that time period.  Nearly three in four deaths occurred among seniors age 75 and over.

SOURCE:  National Vital Statistics System, CDC WONDER.

 


QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged ≥65 Years Who Received Care at Home From a Nurse or Other Health Care Professional During the Past 12 Months

July 10, 2020

In 2018, the percentage of adults aged ≥65 years who received care at home from a nurse or other health care professional during the past 12 months increased with age from 4.5% for adults aged 65–69 years, to 8.2% for those aged 70–74 years and 13.2% for those aged ≥75 years.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6927a7.htm


State Teen Birth Rates by Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2017–2018

July 10, 2020

New NCHS report presents changes in state-specific birth rates for teenagers between 2017 and 2018 by race and Hispanic origin of mother.

Click to access NVSR69-6-508.pdf


Shingles Vaccination Among Adults Aged 60 and Over: United States, 2018

July 9, 2020

Questions for Emily Terlizzi, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Shingles Vaccination Among Adults Aged 60 and Over: United States, 2018.”

Q: Can you summarize how the data varied by sex, age group, race and Hispanic origin, and education?

ET: In 2018, the percentage of adults aged 60 and over who had ever received a shingles vaccine was higher among older adults, non-Hispanic whites, and those who were not poor or had more than a high school diploma or GED. Shingles receipt did not significantly differ by sex.


Q: Are there any trend data that goes back further than 2008?

ET: NHIS trend data on shingles vaccination is not available before 2008, as this was the first year the NHIS asked about this vaccination.


Q: What is the take home message for this report? (The reporter could also say “Any other comments?”)

ET: Shingles vaccination has increased since 2008, however, disparities in receipt of this vaccination still remain.


Q: What resources does the CDC have on shingles vaccination?

ET: The CDC has a lot of useful information online about shingles vaccination. For more information, please visit:

Click to access db370-h.pdf


2010 was the only year since 1999 without an accidental fireworks death in July

June 30, 2020

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QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Percentage of Adults Aged 18 Years or Older Who Currently Have Asthma by Sex and Race/Ethnicity

June 26, 2020

During 2017–2018, women aged 18 years or older were more likely than men (9.7% versus 5.5%) to currently have asthma.

This pattern prevailed in each of the race/ethnicity groups: Hispanic adults (7.8% versus 3.9%); non-Hispanic white adults (10.3% versus 5.9%); non-Hispanic black adults (11.4% versus 6.2%); and non-Hispanic Asian adults (5.0% versus 3.3%).

Non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black men were more likely to currently have asthma than were Hispanic and non-Hispanic Asian men.

The same pattern existed among women.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2017–2018 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6925a7.htm


Effects of Changes in Maternal Age Distribution and Maternal Age-specific Infant Mortality Rates on Infant Mortality Trends: United States, 2000–2017

June 25, 2020

Questions for Anne Driscoll, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Effects of Changes in Maternal Age Distribution and Maternal Age-specific Infant Mortality Rates on Infant Mortality Trends: United States, 2000–2017.”

Q: What is difference between maternal age distribution and maternal age-specific infant mortality rates?

AD: “Maternal age distribution” refers to the percentage of women with a birth in each maternal age category; for example, the percentage who are 15-19 years old, the percentage who are 20-24 years old. The “maternal age-specific infant mortality rate” is the mortality rate of infants born to women in a given maternal age category; for example, the mortality rate of infants born to women who were 20-24 years old.


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

AD: It was somewhat surprising that changes in maternal age distribution mattered little or not at all for the mortality trends for infants born to non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women given the significant changes in the maternal age distribution for both groups during the study period.


Q: How did you obtain this data for this report?

AD: The data are from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS); we used natality data sets and infant mortality data sets from 2000-2017. Natality data sets are comprised of information from all birth certificates in a given year; infant mortality data sets are comprised of information from all death certificates to persons under one year of age in a given year.


Q: What is the take home message for this report? (The reporter could also say “Any other comments?”)

AD: Changes in the age distribution of women giving birth accounted for about one-third of the decline in infant mortality rates from 2000 through 2017 while declines in maternal age-specific mortality rates accounted for about two-thirds of this decline. However, these patterns varied markedly by race and Hispanic origin.


Prevalence of Prescription Pain Medication Use Among Adults: United States, 2015–2018

June 24, 2020

FROM THE AUTHOR

In 2015–2018, 10.7% of U.S. adults used one or more prescription pain medications in the past 30 days.  Prescription pain medication use was higher among women than men overall and within each age category. Use increased with age overall and among men and women. Prescription pain medication use was lowest among non-Hispanic Asian adults, and use among Hispanic adults was lower than among non-Hispanic white adults. This same pattern of prescription pain medication use was observed among both men and women.

Additionally, this report estimated the percentage of adults who used one or more opioid prescription pain medications (with or without use of non-opioid prescription pain medications) and the percentage who used one ore more non-opioid prescription pain medication (without use of prescription opioids).  In 2015–2018, 5.7% of U.S. adults used prescription opioids and 5.0% used non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) in the past 30 days. Use of one or more prescription opioids and use of non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) were higher among women than men, and increased with age, and were lowest among non-Hispanic Asian adults.  Use of one or more prescription opioids among Hispanic adults was lower than among non-Hispanic white adults.

From 2009–2010 to 2017–2018, there was no significant increase in use of prescription opioids, but use of non-opioid prescription pain medications (without prescription opioids) increased.

Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2015–2018.


Lightning Deaths in United States from 1999-2018

June 22, 2020

Source: CDC WONDER https://wonder.cdc.gov 

 


QuickStats: Reason for the Most Recent Colonoscopy Among Adults Aged 50–75 Years Who Had a Test in the Past 10 Years

June 19, 2020

In 2018, 60.6% of U.S. adults aged 50–75 years without a personal history of colorectal cancer had a colonoscopy in the past 10 years.

Of these, 81.2% had their most recent colonoscopy as part of routine screening, 10.6% had their most recent colonoscopy because of a problem, 5.2% as a follow-up to an earlier test or screening exam, and 2.8% for some other reason.

Source: National Health Interview Survey, 2018. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6924a5.htm


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru November 2019)

June 17, 2020

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm