Infant Mortality by Age at Death in the United States, 2016

November 16, 2018

Questions for Danielle Ely, Ph.D., Health Statistician and Author of “Infant Mortality by Age at Death in the United States, 2016

Q:  What made you decide to focus on the age when infants die in this new analysis of infant mortality in the United States?

DE:  We focused this study on the age when infants die for a number for reasons. Age at death is an important factor in the risk of infant mortality. One important statistic is that infants are more likely to die before 28 days of age (neonatal deaths) than infants who live to 28 days and older (postneonatal deaths.) By presenting infant mortality rates by age at death, we show the differences in the likelihood of death between these two infant groups — information that can help inform the U.S. Public Health Community, families, and physicians on this critical age factor in infant lives and deaths.


Q:  What sort of trend data do you have for the demographics and the cause of death data in your new study on infant mortality at the age of death?

DE:  We have interesting trend data here in this report, as well as other public-use resources that are available for further research and data. Our new report looks at the overall trends in infant, neonatal and postneonatal mortality rates from 2007 (the most recent peak in infant mortality) through 2016. For 2016, we looked at infant mortality rates by mother’s race and Hispanic origin and age and cause of death.


Q:  Was there a result in your study’s analysis of infant mortality at the age of death that you hadn’t expected and that really surprised you?

DE:  An important finding in this study is the lack of improvements to infant mortality. Since infant mortality had been on the decline in the United States for much of the last two decades, it was surprising that the infant mortality rate did not show significant declines from 2011-2016. Another recent report also showed a similar lack of improvement in fetal/perinatal mortality rates from 2014 through 2016.


Q:  What differences, if any, did you see in infant mortality among race and ethnic groups, or any other demographics?

DE:  The sometimes substantial differences among race and Hispanic origin groups in this report on infant mortality are noteworthy. We found that infants of non-Hispanic black mothers continue to have total, neonatal, and postneonatal mortality rates that were more than two times as high as infants of non-Hispanic white, Asian or Pacific Islander, or Hispanic mothers. Infants of American Indian or Alaska Native mothers had the next highest rates and had postneonatal mortality rates that were similar to infants of non-Hispanic black mothers.


Q:  What would you say is the take-home message of this report?

DE:  The most important message from this data brief is the lack of improvement in total infant mortality rates since 2011. Neonatal infants of all race and Hispanic origin groups we examined have higher mortality rates than postneonatal infants. Further, infants of non-Hispanic black women continue to have a higher risk of mortality than infants of non-Hispanic white, Asian or Pacific Islander, American Indian or Alaska Native, or Hispanic mothers. This information can further our understanding of current infant mortality trends and provide information on where improvements can be made.

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Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2018

November 15, 2018

A new report from NCHS presents selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the 2018 National Health Interview Survey, along with comparable estimates from previous calendar years. Estimates for the first 6 months of 2018 are based on data for 39,112 persons.

Key Findings:

  • In the first 6 months of 2018, 28.5 million persons of all ages (8.8%) were uninsured at the time of interview—not significantly different from 2017, but 20.1 million fewer persons than in 2010.
  • In the first 6 months of 2018, among adults aged 18–64, 12.5% were uninsured at the time of interview, 20.0% had public coverage, and 69.2% had private health insurance coverage.
  • In the first 6 months of 2018, among children aged 0–17 years, 4.4% were uninsured, 43.4% had public coverage, and 53.6% had private health insurance coverage.
  • Among adults aged 18–64, 69.2% (137.1 million) were covered by private health insurance plans at the time of interview in the first 6 months of 2018. This includes 4% (7.9 million) covered by private health insurance plans obtained through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges.
  • The percentage of persons under age 65 with private health insurance enrolled in a high-deductible health plan increased, from 43.7% in 2017 to 46.0% in the first 6 months of 2018.

Fact or Fiction: Is yoga is the fastest-growing complementary health approach among children and adults in the United States?

November 8, 2018

 


Use Of Yoga and Meditation Becoming More Popular in U.S.

November 8, 2018

The use of yoga and meditation has increased in the U.S., according to two new reports released by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

The first report “Use of Yoga, Meditation, and Chiropractors Among U.S. Adults Aged 18 and Older” examines changes from 2012 to 2017 in the percentage of U.S. adults that used yoga, meditation and chiropractors in the past 12 months. Of the three complementary health approached presented, yoga was the most commonly among U.S. adults in 2012 (9.5%) and 2017 (14.3%). The use of meditation increased more than threefold from 4.1% in 2012 to 14.2% in 2017.

The second report released today, “Use of Yoga, Meditation and Chiropractors Among U.S. Children Aged 4–17 Years,” reveals that U.S. children aged 4-17 years who used yoga in the past 12 months increased significantly from 3.1% in 2012 to 8.4% in 2017. Further examination of 2017 data showed that girls were more likely than boys to have used yoga in the past 12 months (11.3% vs. 5.6%).

Other findings documented in the reports:

  • In 2017, the use of yoga among U.S. adults aged 18-44 (17.9%) was more than twice that of adults 65 years and older (6.7%).
  • In 2017, non-Hispanic white adults were more likely to use yoga (17.1%) and see a chiropractor (12.7%) in the past 12 months compared with Hispanic (8% and 6.6%, respectively) and non-Hispanic black (9.3% and 5.5%, respectively) adults.
  • The use of yoga, meditation and chiropractors saw a significant increase from 2012 to 2017, among U.S. adults.
  • Use of meditation increased significantly for U.S. children from 0.6% in 2012 to 5.4% in 2017.
  • Older U.S. children aged 12-17 were more likely to have used meditation (6.5%) and a chiropractor (5.1%) than younger children aged 4-11 (4.7% and 2.1% respectively) in 2017.
  • There was no significant difference in the use of a chiropractor for children from 2012 to 2017.

The two reports, “Use of Yoga, Meditation, and Chiropractors Among U.S. Adults Aged 18 and Older” and “Use of Yoga, Meditation and Chiropractors Among U.S. Children Aged 4–17 Years” are available on the NCHS web site at www.cdc.gov/nchs.


“Births: Final Data for 2017” Released

November 7, 2018

The comprehensive report on final births data for the United States was released on November 7, 2018, documenting a total of 3,855,500 births registered in the United States, down 2% from 2016. Compared with rates in 2016, the general fertility rate declined to 60.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44. The birth rate for females aged 15–19 fell 7% in 2017. Birth rates declined for women in their 20s and 30s but increased for women in their early 40s. The total fertility rate declined to 1,765.5 births per 1,000 women in 2017. Birth rates for both married and unmarried women declined from 2016 to 2017, and the percentage of babies born to unmarried women (39.8) did not change between 2016 and 2017.  Many of these findings were documented in a May 2018 provisional release of 2017 data.

The final data are contained in the new publication “Births: Final Data for 2017.”

Some new data for 2017 are included for the first time in the new report:

  • The percentage of women who began prenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy rose to 77.3% in 2017.
  • The percentage of all women who smoked during pregnancy declined to 6.9%. Percentages dropped for all race/ethnic groups from 2016 to 2017 except for Hispanic mothers (no change) and Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander mothers (a 0.1 percentage point increase).
  • Medicaid was the source of payment for 43.0% of all births in 2017, up 1% from 2016.
  • Twin and triplet and higher-order multiple birth rates were essentially stable in 2017.
  • The average age of U.S. mothers at first birth in 2017 was 26.8 years, an increase from 26.6 years in 2016 – and a new all-time high.

QuickStats: Percentage of Residential Care Communities by U.S. Census Region — National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2012–2016

November 2, 2018

During 2012–2016, the percentage of residential care communities located in the West increased from 36.4% to 40.8%.

Throughout the period, a higher percentage of residential care communities were located in the West compared with other regions.

The percentage of residential care communities declined from 30.6% in 2012 to 28% in 2016 in the South and from 10.1% to 8.6% in the Northeast. In the Midwest, the percentage was 22.9% in 2012 and 22.6% in 2016.

Source: National Study of Long-Term Care Providers, 2012–2016 data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/index.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6743a7.htm


QuickStats: Prevalence of Anemia Among Adults Aged 65 Years or Older, by Sex and Age Group — National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2013–2016

October 29, 2018

During 2013–2016, the prevalence of anemia among persons aged 65 years or older increased with increasing age for both men and women.

Among men, the prevalence increased from 7.4% for those aged 65–74 years to 39.5% for those aged 85 years or older.

The percentage of women with anemia increased from 7.6% for those aged 65–74 years to 21.9% for those aged 85 years or older.

The prevalence of anemia was higher for men compared to women among those aged 75–84 years and those aged 85 years or older.

Source: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2013–2016. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/index.htm; Seitz AE, et al. Anemia prevalence and trends in adults aged 65 and older: U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey: 2001–2004 to 2013–2016. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/jgs.15530.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/67/wr/mm6742a8.htm