Stat of the Day – December 5, 2017

December 5, 2017

Advertisements

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults Aged 20–64 Years With a Fasting Test in the Past 12 Months for High Blood Sugar or Diabetes, by Race/Ethnicity — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2011 and 2016

December 4, 2017

The percentage of U.S. adults aged 20–64 years who had a fasting test for high blood sugar or diabetes in the past 12 months increased from 39.7% in 2011 to 45.7% in 2016.

From 2011 to 2016, there was an increase in the percentage for all racial/ethnic groups examined: Hispanic (38.3% to 43.0%), non-Hispanic white (39.6% to 46.5%), non-Hispanic black (41.2% to 44.9%), and non-Hispanic Asian (41.5% to 49.6%) adults.

In 2011, there was no statistically significant difference among the four groups examined, but in 2016, Hispanic adults were less likely than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian adults to have had a fasting test, and non-Hispanic Asian adults were more likely than non-Hispanic black adults to have had one.

Source: National Health Interview Survey

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6647a7.htm


Stat of the Day – November 30, 2017

November 30, 2017


Estimated Prevalence of Children With Diagnosed Developmental Disabilities in the United States, 2014–2016

November 29, 2017

Questions for Ben Zablotsky, Ph.D., Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Estimated Prevalence of Children with Diagnosed Developmental Disabilities in the United States, 2014-2016.”

Q: Why did you decide to analyze children with diagnosed developmental disabilities?

BZ: We decided to analyze children with diagnosed developmental disability because children diagnosed with developmental disabilities typically require a substantial number of services and treatment to address both behavioral and developmental challenges.  Measuring the prevalence of children with these conditions aids in assessing the adequacy of available services and interventions that may improve long-term outcomes.


Q: Can you explain the differences between the diagnosed developmental disabilities studied in this report?

BZ: The three conditions studied in this report included autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, and any other developmental delay.  All three conditions are considered to be developmental disabilities.  Autism spectrum disorder refers to a group of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments in social communication and the presence of repetitive or restricted interests.  Intellectual disability is a term used when there are limits to a child’s ability to learn at an expected level and function in daily life.  Other developmental delay serves as a catch-all for children who are delayed for various developmental milestones, for example taking first steps, smiling for the first time, and speaking.


Q: What do you think is the most interesting demographic finding among your new study’s findings?

BZ: I found the fact that the prevalence of any developmental disability was lowest among Hispanic children compared with all other race and ethnicity groups to be the most interesting finding.  The prevalence of any developmental disability among Hispanic children was 4.69% compared to 7.04% for non-Hispanic white children, 6.20% for non-Hispanic black children, and 6.16% for non-Hispanic other children.


Q: Are there any previous reports released from NCHS on diagnosed developmental disabilities in children?

BZ: Yes, this report can be viewed as a follow-up to a National Health Statistics Report (No. 87) from 2015, where the prevalence of any developmental disability in 2014 was also reported (5.76%).  The current report shows this prevalence subsequently increased to 6.99% in 2016.


Q: Can you explain the methodology used for this analysis?

BZ: Children with developmental disabilities were identified through a series of survey questions within the child component of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) from 2014 to 2016.  Characteristics of these children were examined, including whether differences exist in prevalence by survey year.


Q: What do you think is the take home message from this report?

BZ: There was a notable increase in the prevalence of developmental disabilities between 2014-2016, which is largely the result of an increase in the prevalence of children diagnosed with developmental delay other than autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability.


QuickStats: Percentage of Visits to Office-Based Physicians by Adults Aged 18 Years or Older for Diabetes Mellitus, by Sex and Age — National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015

November 27, 2017

In 2015, diabetes was a reason for 4.2% of visits by adults to office-based physicians.

Men aged 18–44 years had a higher percentage of visits for diabetes compared with women aged 18–44 years (2.2% versus 0.4%, respectively).

Both women and men aged 18–44 years had a lower percentage of visits for diabetes compared with adults aged 45–64 and over 65 years.

Source: National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 2015 data

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6646a7.htm 

 


Stat of the Day – November 21, 2017

November 21, 2017


Health Insurance Coverage: Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2017

November 16, 2017

Emily P. Zammitti, M.P.H., Associate Service Fellow

Questions for Emily P. Zammitti, M.P.H., Associate Service Fellow and Lead Author on “Health Insurance Coverage: Estimates from the National Health Interview Survey, January-June 2017

Q: What is new in this report?

EZ: What’s new in this report is that we are putting out estimates based on data collected from January through June of 2017. For example, in the first 6 months of 2017, 9.0% of persons of all ages were uninsured, 36.4% had public coverage, and 62.6% had private coverage at the time of interview. For the first time using 2017 data, this report also presents state-level estimates for 11 states.


Q: What does your data show this year for Americans who have high-deductible health insurance plans compared to previous years?

 EZ: We’re seeing a continued climb in the percentage enrolled in high-deductible health insurance plans. In the first 6 months of 2017, 42.9% of privately insured persons under age 65 were enrolled in a high-deductible health plan, or an HDHP. Enrollment in HDHPs has increased from 25.3% in 2010, and more recently, has increased from 39.4% in 2016.  


Q: How has coverage through tax-advantaged health savings account insurance plans changed in 2017? 

EZ: This is another area where we’re seeing a statistically significant increase – Americans enrolled in tax-advantaged health savings account insurance plans. Among persons under age 65 who had private health insurance coverage, the percentage who had a high-deductible health plan with a health savings account, or a consumer-directed health plan, has more than doubled, from 7.7% in 2010 to 17.4% in the first 6 months of 2017. More recently, the percentage of those enrolled in a consumer-directed health plan increased from 15.5% in 2016 to 17.4%.


Q: Are a lot of Americans finding coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplaces?

EZ: This new report does offer updated statistics on the number of Americans finding coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplaces. Among persons under age 65, 65.4% (176.8 million people) were covered by private health insurance plans at the time of interview in the first 6 months of 2017. This includes 3.7% (10.1 million people) covered by private plans obtained through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges.


Q: What do you see in state-level estimates of health insurance coverage this year so far?

EZ: This report presents estimates of health insurance coverage in the first half of 2017 for 11 states: California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Virginia. Of these 11 states, in the first 6 months of 2017, the percentage of adults aged 18-64 who were uninsured was highest in Texas (25.1%), and lowest in New York (7.0%).  Despite variation in the uninsured estimates between 2016 and the first 6 months of 2017, none of the differences for any of the 11 selected states were significant.


Q: What is the take-home message from this report? 

EZ: I think the real take-home message from this report is found in the number of Americans who no longer lack health insurance. In the first 6 months of 2017, 28.8 million (9.0%) persons of all ages were uninsured at the time of interview. This estimate is not significantly different from 2016, but there are 19.8 million fewer uninsured persons than in 2010.