STATE VITALS: MISSOURI

December 17, 2014

The state of Missouri scores lower than the nation overall in percent in births to unmarried mothers, cesarean delivery rate and preterm birth rate.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, Missouri has mortality rates that are higher than the U.S. rates for the following causes: heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, influenza/pneumonia, kidney disease and suicide.


Nut Consumption Among U.S. Adults, 2009–2010

December 17, 2014

The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans encourage the consumption of nutrient-dense foods such as nuts and seeds. Nut consumption has been associated with improved nutrient intake and diet quality and improved health outcomes, including those related to cardiovascular disease.

An NCHS report examines the percentage of U.S. adults who consumed nuts on a given day, using data from one in-person, 24-hour dietary recall interview.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Almost 40% (38.2%) of adults consumed nuts on a given day.
  • More non-Hispanic white (43.6%) than non-Hispanic black (23.7%) or Hispanic (25.5%) adults consumed nuts.
  • Approximately 80% of nuts consumed (84.0% by men and 79.7% by women) were nuts or seeds as single-item foods or nut butters.

 


Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, January–June 2014

December 16, 2014

NCHS has released selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), along with comparable estimates from the 2009–2013 NHIS. Estimates for January–June 2014 are based on data for 56,784 persons.

Three estimates of lack of health insurance coverage are provided: (a) uninsured at the time of interview, (b) uninsured at least part of the year prior to interview (which includes persons uninsured for more than a year), and (c) uninsured for more than a year at the time of interview.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In the first 6 months of 2014, 38.0 million persons of all ages (12.2%) were uninsured at the time of interview, 54.0 million (17.3%) had been uninsured for at least part of the year prior to interview, and 27.3 million (8.7%) had been uninsured for more than a year at the time of interview.
  • Among persons under age 65, 62.8% (168.3 million) were covered by private health insurance plans at the time of interview. This includes 1.9% (5.0 million) covered by private plans through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges at the time of interview between January and June 2014. The proportion with exchange coverage increased from 1.4% (3.7 million) in the first quarter of 2014 (January–March) to 2.4% (6.3 million) in the second quarter of 2014 (April–June).
  • Among adults aged 18–64, the percentage who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 20.4% in 2013 to 17.0% in the first 6 months of 2014.
  • Among adults aged 19–25, the percentage who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 26.5% in 2013 to 20.1% in the first 6 months of 2014.
  • In the first 6 months of 2014, the percentage of persons under age 65 who were uninsured at the time of interview varied by state. For example, 8.0% were uninsured in Pennsylvania, whereas 23.0% were uninsured in Texas.

Current Contraceptive Status Among Women Aged 15–44: United States, 2011–2013

December 15, 2014

Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, a new NCHS report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15–44 in the United States.

In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2011–2013, 61.7% of the 60.9 million women aged 15–44 in the United States were currently using contraception. The most common contraceptive methods currently being used were the pill (16.0%), female sterilization (15.5%), male condoms (9.4%), and long-acting reversible contraceptives (7.2%).
  • Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was higher among women aged 25–34 (11.1%) compared with women aged 15–24 (5.0%) and aged 35–44 (5.3%).
  • Current condom use was similar across the three Hispanic origin and race groups shown in this report (about 9%).
  • Current use of female sterilization declined, and use of the pill increased with greater educational attainment. Use of long-acting reversible contraceptives was similar across education, about 8%–10%.

 


Births Resulting From Assisted Reproductive Technology: Comparing Birth Certificate and National ART Surveillance System Data, 2011

December 10, 2014

A new NCHS report compares data on births resulting from assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures from 2011 birth certificates with data from the 2011 National ART Surveillance System (NASS) among the subset of jurisdictions that adopted the 2003 revised birth certificate as of January 1, 2011, with information on ART.

Birth certificate data are based on 100% of births registered in 27 states and the District of Columbia. NASS data included all ART cycles initiated in 2010 or 2011 for which a live birth in 2011 was reported. The same reporting area was used for both data sources and represents 67% of all births in the United States in 2011. A ratio was computed by dividing the percentage of births resulting from ART procedures for NASS data by the percentage for birth certificate data. A ratio of 1.0 represents equivalent levels of reporting. Because this reporting area is not a random sample of births, the results are not generalizable to the United States as a whole.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Overall, the percentage of births resulting from ART procedures was 2.06 times higher for NASS data (1.44%) compared with birth certificate data (0.70%).
  • The ratio for each jurisdiction varied from 1.04 for Utah and Wisconsin to 7.50 for Florida.
  • Higher-risk groups had more consistent reporting between data sources [e.g., triplet or higher-order multiples (1.36) compared with singletons (2.11)].

Discussions Between Health Care Providers and Their Patients Who Smoke Cigarettes

December 8, 2014

Smoking is the primary cause of preventable death in the United States. Studies show that a majority of smokers would like to quit and that even simple advice from physicians has a positive effect on cessation rates. Federal and nonprofit agencies have recommended screening and identification of smokers by clinicians and health care delivery systems, as well as intervention and guidance on quitting. Studies suggest that older persons, women, heavier smokers, and those in poorer health are more likely to receive medical advice to quit smoking.

A new NCHS report extends earlier research by identifying key population and health characteristics associated with those U.S. cigarette smokers aged 18 and over who had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • About one-half of adult cigarette smokers had a doctor or other health professional talk to them about their smoking in the past 12 months.
  • Men, younger adults, Hispanic adults, and non-Hispanic Asian adults were less likely than other cigarette smokers to have had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.
  • Healthier smokers, younger smokers, and those who did not smoke cigarettes every day were less likely than other cigarette smokers to have had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.
  • Cigarette smokers with selected health conditions linked to smoking were more likely than those without these conditions to have had a health professional talk to them about their smoking.

 


Births in the United States, 2013

December 4, 2014

A new NCHS report presents 2013 final birth data on several key demographic and maternal and infant health indicators. Trends in the number of births, general fertility rates, age-specific birth rates, and cesarean delivery rates by race and Hispanic origin, as well as trends in preterm births by state and trends in twin births are explored, with special focus on the most current period, 2012–2013. A previous report presented 2013 preliminary data on selected topics. Data are from the annual national natality files, representing 100% of births to U.S. residents.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • There were 3.93 million births in the United States in 2013, down less than 1% from 2012 and 9% from the 2007 high. The U.S. general fertility rate was at an all-time low in 2013.
  • Birth rates dropped to record lows in 2013 among women under age 30 and rose for most age groups 30 and over.
  • The cesarean delivery rate declined 1% from 2012 to 2013, to 32.7% of births. This rate rose nearly 60% from 1996 to 2009, but was down slightly from the 2009 high.
  • The 2013 preterm birth rate was 11.39%, down 1% from 2012 and 11% from the 2006 peak. Declines in preterm rates since 2006 were reported across the United States.
  • The twin birth rate, which had been mostly stable for 2009–2012, rose 2% in 2013 to 33.7 per 1,000 births.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,248 other followers