Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013

March 4, 2015

Drug poisoning (overdose) is the number one cause of injury-related death in the United States, with 43,982 deaths occurring in 2013. While much attention has been given to deaths involving opioid analgesics, in recent years there has been a steady increase in the number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin. A recent study using data from 28 states reported that the death rate for heroin overdose doubled from 2010 through 2012.

Using data from the National Vital Statistics System, a new NCHS report provides a description of trends and demographics for heroin-related drug-poisoning deaths in the United States from 2000 through 2013.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin nearly quadrupled from 0.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2013. Most of the increase occurred after 2010.
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin was nearly four times higher for men (6,525 deaths) than women (1,732 deaths) in 2013.
  • In 2000, non-Hispanic black persons aged 45–64 had the highest rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin (2.0 per 100,000). In 2013, non-Hispanic white persons aged 18–44 had the highest rate (7.0 per 100,000).
  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin increased for all regions of the country, with the greatest increase seen in the Midwest.

 


Problems Paying Medical Bills Among Persons Under Age 65

February 27, 2015

Previous work has shown that in the first half of 2011 through the first half of 2013, approximately one in five persons under age 65 was in a family with problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.

A new NCHS report provides updated estimates for the percentage of persons under age 65 who were in families having problems paying medical bills, by selected demographic variables, based on data from January 2011 through June 2014 of the National Health Interview Survey.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The percentage of persons under age 65 who were in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 21.3% (56.5 million) in 2011 to 17.8% (47.7 million) in the first 6 months of 2014.
  • Within each year, from 2011 through June 2014, children aged 0–17 years were more likely than adults aged 18–64 to be in families having problems paying medical bills.
  • The percentage of children aged 0–17 years who were in families having problems paying medical bills decreased from 23.2% in 2011 to 19.0% in the first 6 months of 2014.
  • In the first 6 months of 2014, among persons under age 65, 31.2% of those who were uninsured, 24.2% of those who had public coverage, and 12.4% of those who had private coverage were in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.
  • In the first 6 months of 2014, 27.1% of poor, 28.0% of near poor, and 12.6% of not poor persons under age 65 were in families having problems paying medical bills in the past 12 months.

Prescription Opioid Analgesic Use Among Adults: United States, 1999–2012

February 25, 2015

Prescription opioid analgesics are used to treat pain from surgery, injury, and health conditions such as cancer. Opioid dependence and opioid-related deaths are growing public health problems. Opioid analgesic sales (in kilograms per 10,000) quadrupled from 1999 to 2010, and from 1999 to 2012, opioid-related deaths (per 100,000) more than tripled. During 1999–2002, 4.2% of persons aged 18 and over used a prescription opioid analgesic in the past 30 days.

A new NCHS report provides updated estimates and trends in prescription opioid analgesic use among adults aged 20 and over, overall and by selected subgroups.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • From 1999–2002 to 2003–2006, the percentage of adults aged 20 and over who used a prescription opioid analgesic in the past 30 days increased from 5.0% to 6.9%. From 2003–2006 to 2011–2012, the percentage who used an opioid analgesic remained stable at 6.9%.
  • From 1999–2002 to 2011–2012, the percentage of opioid analgesic users who used an opioid analgesic stronger than morphine increased from 17.0% to 37.0%.
  • During 2007–2012, the use of opioid analgesics was higher among women (7.2%) than men (6.3%).
  • During 2007–2012, the use of opioid analgesics was higher among non-Hispanic white adults (7.5%) compared with Hispanic adults (4.9%). There was no significant difference in use between non-Hispanic white adults and non-Hispanic black adults (6.5%).

 


Trends in Long-acting Reversible Contraception Use Among U.S. Women Aged 15–44

February 24, 2015

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), which include intrauterine devices (IUDs) and subdermal hormonal implants, are gaining popularity due to their high efficacy in preventing unintended pregnancies. IUD use was more common among U.S. women in the 1970s before concerns over safety led to a decline in use; however, since approval of a 5-year contraceptive implant in 1990 and redesigned IUDs, there has been growing interest in the use of LARCs for unintended pregnancy prevention.

Using data from the 1982, 1988, 1995, 2002, 2006–2010, and 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth, a new NCHS report examines trends in current LARC use among women aged 15–44 and describes patterns of use by age, race and Hispanic origin, and parity.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Use of LARCs declined between 1982 and 1988, remained stable through 2002, and then increased nearly five-fold in the last decade among women aged 15–44, from 1.5% in 2002 to 7.2% in 2011–2013.
  • The percentage of women using LARCs has remained highest among women aged 25–34, with more than twice as many women aged 25–34 (11.1%) using LARCs in 2011–2013 compared with women aged 15–24 (5.0%) and aged 35–44 (5.3%).
  • After decreasing between 1982 and 1988 and remaining stable from 1988 through 1995, LARC-use patterns diverged among Hispanic, non-Hispanic white, and non-Hispanic black women.
  • Women who have had at least one birth use LARCs at a higher rate compared with women who have had no previous births, and this difference has increased over time.

QuickStats: Percentage of Men Aged 25–74 Years Who Consume 15 or More Alcoholic Drinks Per Week

February 23, 2015

During 2011–2013, male veterans aged 25–74 years were more likely to consume an average of 15 or more alcoholic drinks per week in the last year (“heavy drinking”) compared with nonveterans (7% versus 5%).

Among men aged 25–34 years, the proportion of veterans who were heavy drinkers was 9%, higher than the 6% observed in nonveterans. Similarly, veterans were more likely than nonveterans to be heavy drinkers among men aged 55–64 years (7% versus 5%) and men aged 65–74 years (7% versus 4%).

There was no significant difference in the proportion of veterans compared with nonveterans who were heavy drinkers among men aged 35–44 years or men aged 45–54 years.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6406a10.htm


Progress With Electronic Health Record Adoption

February 19, 2015

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 provides incentive payments to eligible hospitals and providers that demonstrate the meaningful use of a certified electronic health record (EHR) system.

A new report describes the adoption of EHRs in hospital emergency departments (EDs) and outpatient departments (OPDs) from 2006 through 2011 using the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2011, 84% of hospital emergency departments used an electronic health record system.
  • Adoption of a basic EHR system with a specific set of functionalities by EDs increased from 19% in 2007 to 54% in 2011.
  • In 2011, 73% of hospital outpatient departments used an EHR system, up from 29% in 2006.
  • Adoption of a basic EHR system with a specific set of functionalities by OPDs increased from 9% in 2007 to 57% in 2011.
  • From 2007 through 2011, adoption of Stage 1 Meaningful Use objectives by EDs and OPDs increased.
  • In 2011, 14% of EDs and 16% of OPDs had EHR technology able to support nine Stage 1 Meaningful Use objectives.

STATE VITALS: NEVADA

February 18, 2015

The state of Nevada scores higher than the nation overall in births to unmarried mothers, cesarean deliveries, preterm births and teen births.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, the silver state has mortality rates that are lower than the U.S. rates for the following causes: cancer, stroke, Alzheimer’s Disease and diabetes.

Here is a list of the 15 leading causes of death in Nevada in 2012 with ICD 10 codes:

1 Diseases of heart (I00-I09,I11,I13,I20-I51)

2 Malignant neoplasms (C00-C97)

3 Chronic lower respiratory diseases (J40-J47)

4 Accidents (unintentional injuries) (V01-X59,Y85-Y86)

5 Cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69)

6 Intentional self-harm (suicide) (U03,X60-X84,Y87.0)

7 Influenza and pneumonia (J09-J18)

8 Diabetes mellitus (E10-E14)

9 Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis (K70,K73-K74)

10 Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis (N00-N07,N17-N19,N25-N27)

11 Alzheimer’s disease (G30)

12 Septicemia (A40-A41)

13 Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease (I10,I12,I15)

14 Parkinson’s disease (G20-G21)

15 Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids (J69)


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