Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January–March 2014 National Health Interview Survey

September 16, 2014

NCHS has released updates estimates for 15 selected health measures based on data from the January–March 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and presents estimates from 1997 through 2013 for comparison.

The 15 measure included in the report are lack of health insurance coverage and type of coverage, having a usual place to go for medical care, obtaining needed medical care, receipt of influenza vaccination, receipt of pneumococcal vaccination, obesity, leisure-time physical activity, current cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing, general health status, personal care needs, serious psychological distress, diagnosed diabetes, and asthma episodes and current asthma.

The Early Release measures are being published prior to final data editing and final weighting to provide access to the most recent information from NHIS. The estimates will be updated as each new quarter of NHIS data becomes available.


Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Opioid Analgesics: United States, 1999–2011

September 16, 2014

Poisoning is the leading cause of injury death in the United States. Drugs—both illicit and pharmaceutical—are the major cause of poisoning deaths, accounting for 90% of poisoning deaths in 2011.  Misuse or abuse of prescription drugs, including opioid-analgesic pain relievers, is responsible for much of the recent increase in drug-poisoning deaths.

A new report highlights trends in drug-poisoning deaths involving opioid analgesics (referred to as opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths) and updates previous Data Briefs on this topic.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The age-adjusted rate for opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths nearly quadrupled from 1.4 per 100,000 in 1999 to 5.4 per 100,000 in 2011.
  • Although the opioid-analgesic poisoning death rates increased each year from 1999 through 2011, the rate of increase has slowed since 2006.
  • Natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics, such as hydrocodone, morphine, and oxycodone, were involved in 11,693 drug-poisoning deaths in 2011, up from 2,749 deaths in 1999.
  • Benzodiazepines were involved in 31% of the opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 2011, up from 13% of the opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths in 1999.
  • During the past decade, adults aged 55–64 and non-Hispanic white persons experienced the greatest increase in the rates of opioid-analgesic poisoning deaths.

New Reports on Adult Day Services Centers

September 10, 2014

NCHS has released two new reports on adult day services centers.  The reports, Differences in Adult Day Services Center Participant Characteristics by Center Ownership: United States, 2012 and Differences in Adult Day Services Center Characteristics by Center Ownership: United States, 2012, looked at selected characteristics of adult day services center participants in 2012 and compared them by center ownership using data from the National Study of Long-Term Care Providers.

The 4,800 adult day services centers nationwide provide a variety of services to their 273,200 participants, the majority of whom are older adults and women.  Unlike other long-term care providers, such as nursing homes, home health agencies, hospices, and residential care communities, the majority of adult day services centers are nonprofit. However, for-profit ownership of adult day services centers appears to be increasing, from 27% in 2010 to 40% in 2012.

State-level estimates for characteristics presented in this data brief are available from: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/nsltcp_products.htm.

Key Findings from the Reports:

  • In 2012, more than one-third of participants in adult day services centers were younger than 65. A higher percentage of participants in nonprofit centers than in for-profit centers were younger than 65.
  • About one-half of participants in adult day services centers were non-Hispanic white persons. A higher percentage of participants in for-profit centers than in nonprofit centers were Hispanic or were non-Hispanic and of a race other than black or white.
  • Almost one-third of adult day services center participants had Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, and about one-quarter had a developmental disability. A lower percentage of participants in for-profit than in nonprofit centers had Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias or a developmental disability.

 

  • About 60% of adult day services centers used a standardized tool to screen for cognitive impairment, and about 20% used a standardized tool for depression screening. A greater percentage of for-profit than nonprofit centers used these tools.
  • More than one-half of adult day services centers provided skilled nursing, therapeutic, and social work services, while less than one-half of centers provided mental health, pharmacy, and dental services. With the exception of social work services, a greater percentage of for-profit than nonprofit centers provided these services.
  • Almost all adult day services centers provided daily transportation to and from the center.

 

 

 


QuickStats: Life Expectancy at Birth, by Sex and Race/Ethnicity — United States, 2011

September 8, 2014

In 2011, life expectancy at birth was 78.7 years for the total U.S. population, 76.3 years for males, and 81.1 years for females. Life expectancy was highest for Hispanics for both males and females. In each racial/ethnic group, females had higher life expectancies than males. Life expectancy ranged from 71.7 years for non-Hispanic black males to 83.7 years for Hispanic females.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6335a8.htm


STATE VITALS: MARYLAND

September 8, 2014

The state of Maryland scores lower than the nation overall in teen birth rate. The state also has a lower mortality rate in firearm and drug poisoning deaths.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, Maryland has mortality rates that are higher than the U.S. rates for the following causes: heart disease and influenza/pneumonia.


Use of Selected Nonmedication Mental Health Services by Adolescent Boys and Girls With Serious Emotional or Behavioral Difficulties: United States, 2010–2012

August 27, 2014

Mental health is a key component of a child’s overall wellbeing. Previous research using data from the National Health Interview Survey found that about 6% of adolescents have serious emotional or behavioral difficulties. Both medication and nonmedication services have been found to be effective for treatment. Two recent reports from the National Center for Health Statistics have presented estimates of medication use among U.S. adolescents. The use of prescription medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties was higher among boys than girls.

A new report from NCHS describes differences between boys and girls in the use of nonmedication mental health services in various school and nonschool settings among adolescents aged 12–17 with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • About 4% of adolescents aged 12–17 had a serious emotional or behavioral difficulty and received nonmedication mental health services in the past 6 months.
  • Nearly 71% of adolescents with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties received nonmedication mental health services in the past 6 months.
  • Among adolescents with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties, boys were more likely than girls to receive nonmedication mental health services.
  • Boys with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties were more likely than girls to receive services in school settings.
  • The percentage of boys and girls with serious emotional or behavioral difficulties receiving nonschool services was similar for all settings except for the emergency department.

 


National and State Patterns of Teen Births in the United States, 1940–2013

August 20, 2014

Teen childbearing in the United States has been declining for more than half a century. Except for a brief but steep increase in teen birth rates from 1986 to 1991 and smaller upturns during 1969–1970, 1979–1980, and 2005–2007, birth rates for U.S. teenagers have fallen since 1957. The birth rate in 2013, 26.6 births per 1,000 teenagers aged 15–19, was less than one-half of the rate in 1991 (61.8 per 1,000) and less than one-third of the rate in 1957 (96.3), when the United States rate was at its peak. The overall reductions in teen birth rates have been shared across all age groups, race and ethnicity groups, and states.

A new NCHS report presents trends from 1940 through 2013 in national birth rates for teenagers, with particular focus on the period since 1991. The percent changes in rates for 1991–2012 and
the for 2007–2012 are presented for the United States and for states. Preliminary data for 2013 are shown where available.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Teen childbearing has been on a long-term downward trend, with only four exceptions since peaking in 1957. The rate in 1957 was 96.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15–19. The rate dropped almost one-third to 65.5 in 1969.
  • The rate then increased 4% in 1969–1970 (68.3) before resuming a decline that continued until 1979–1980 and again until 1986 (50.2). From 1986 through 1991, the birth rate rose 23%. Since 1991, the rate has fallen 57% and the decline has been continuous except for a 5% rise during 2005–2007.
  • The pace of decline accelerated from 2007 forward, with the rate reaching 26.6 per 1,000 in 2013, a drop of 36% from 2007.
  • The 2013 rate is less than one-third of the 1957 peak rate.

 


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