Men’s Health Month

June 29, 2015

June is Men’s Health Month. It’s important for men to be aware of their health and seek treatment of diseases.  The life expectancy for men has gone from 60.8 in 1940 to 76.4 in 2013 and the number on cause of death among men is heart disease.

One-third of U.S. men were obese in 2011–2012.  Men aged 40–59 had a higher prevalence of obesity (39.4%) than did men aged 20–39 (29%) and men aged 60 and over (32%). However, there was no difference in the prevalence of obesity between men aged 20–39 and those aged 60 and over.

The percentage of  U.S. men under the age of 65 without health insurance at time of interview which dropped from 18% in 2013 to 14.7% in 2014.  Also, the percentage of U.S. men who currently smoke cigarettes dropped slightly from 20.5% in 2013 to 18.9% in 2014.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/mens-health.htm

http://www.cdc.gov/men/

 

 


Wireless Substitution: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, July–December 2014

June 23, 2015

Preliminary results from the July– December 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) indicate that the number of American homes with only wireless telephones continues to grow.

More than two in every five American homes (45.4%) had only wireless telephones (also known as cellular telephones, cell phones, or mobile phones) during the second half of 2014—an increase of 4.4 percentage points since the second half of 2013. More than one-half of all adults aged 18-44 and of children under 18 were living in wireless-only households.

A new NCHS report presents the most up-to-date estimates available from the federal government concerning the size and characteristics of these populations.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In the second 6 months of 2014, more than two in every five households (45.4%) did not have a landline telephone but did have at least one wireless telephone.
  • Approximately 106 million adults (44.1% of all adults) lived in households with only wireless telephones; about 40 million children (54.1% of all children) lived in households with only wireless telephones.
  • More than two-thirds of adults aged 25–29 (69.2%) and aged 30-34 (67.4%) lived in households with only wireless telephones. These rates are greater than the rate for those 18–24 (57.8%).
  • The percentage of adults living with only wireless telephones decreased as age increased beyond 35 years: 53.7% for those 35–44; 36.8% for those 45–64; and 17.1% for those 65 and over.
  • Four in five adults living only with unrelated adult roommates (81.3%) were in households with only wireless telephones. This rate is higher than the rates for adults living alone (49.5%), adults living only with spouses or other adult family members (35.8%), and adults living with children (50.8%).
  • Two in three adults living in rented homes (66.2%) had only wireless telephones. This rate is twice the rate for adults living in homes owned by a household member (33.1%).
  • Adults living in poverty (59.4%) were more likely than those living near poverty (51.1%) and higher income adults (42.5%) to be living in households with only wireless telephones.

Health Insurance Coverage: Early Release of Estimates From the National Health Interview Survey, 2014

June 23, 2015

NCHS has released selected estimates of health insurance coverage for the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population based on data from the 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), along with comparable estimates from the 2009–2013 NHIS. Estimates for 2014 are based on data for 111,682 persons.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • In 2014, 36.0 million persons of all ages (11.5%) were uninsured at the time of interview, 51.6 million (16.5%) had been uninsured for at least part of the year prior to interview, and 26.3 million (8.4%) had been uninsured for more than a year at the time of interview.
  • Among persons under age 65, 63.6% (170.4 million) were covered by private health insurance plans at the time of interview. This includes 2.2% (5.9 million) covered by private plans through the Health Insurance Marketplace or state-based exchanges at the time of interview between January and December 2014. The proportion with exchange coverage increased from 1.4% (3.7 million) in the first quarter of 2014 (January–March) to 2.5% (6.7 million) in the fourth quarter of 2014 (October–December).
  • Among adults aged 18–64, the percentage who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 20.4% in 2013 to 16.3% in 2014.
  • Among adults aged 19–25, the percentage who were uninsured at the time of interview decreased from 26.5% in 2013 to 20.0% in 2014.
  • In 2014, the percentage of persons under age 65 who were uninsured at the time of interview varied by state. For example, 2.5% were uninsured in Hawaii, whereas 21.5% were uninsured in Oklahoma and Texas.

 


Births: Preliminary Data for 2014

June 17, 2015

NCHS has just released a new report that presents preliminary data on births and birth rates and selected maternal and infant health characteristics for the United States in 2014.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The 2014 preliminary number of U.S. births was 3,985,924, an increase of 1% from 2013.
  • The number of births increased for women in all race and Hispanic origin groups in 2014 except for American Indian or Alaska Native women, for whom births decreased.
  • The general fertility rate was 62.9 births per 1,000 women aged 15–44, up 1% from 2013, and the first increase in the fertility rate since 2007.
  • The birth rate for teenagers aged 15–19 decreased 9% in 2014 to 24.2 births per 1,000 women, yet another historic low for the nation; rates decreased for both younger and older teenagers to record lows. The birth rate for women in their early 20s declined to 79 births per 1,000 women, another record low.
  • Birth rates for women in their 30s and early 40s increased in 2014.
  • The nonmarital birth rate declined 1% in 2014, to 44.0 births per 1,000 unmarried women aged 15–44, dropping for six consecutive years.
  • The cesarean delivery rate was down 2%, and the low-risk cesarean delivery rate was down 3%, in 2014.
  • The preterm birth rate (based on a change in measure) was down in 2014 to 9.57%. The low birthweight rate was essentially unchanged in 2014 at 8%.

 


STATE VITALS: NORTH DAKOTA

June 16, 2015

The state of North Dakota scores lower than the nation overall in births to unmarried mothers, cesarean deliveries, preterm births and low birthweight.

However, among the 10 leading causes of death in the United States, North Dakota has mortality rates that are higher than the U.S. rates for the following causes: stroke, accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, kidney disease and suicide.

 


Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Men’s Use of Mental Health Treatments

June 12, 2015

Compared with white Americans, persons of other races in the United States are less likely to have access to and receive needed mental health care.

Few studies, however, have explored such disparities specifically among men. Mental health and treatment have traditionally received less attention for men than women, perhaps because men are less likely than women to report mental health problems and to receive services for these problems.

A new NCHS report uses nationally representative data on frequency of mental health symptoms and related treatment utilization to compare men of color (that is, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic men) with non-Hispanic white men. It also explores whether racial and ethnic disparities differ by age, health insurance coverage status, and income.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Nearly 9% of men (8.5%) had daily feelings of anxiety or depression. Less than one-half of them (41.0%) took medication for these feelings or had recently talked to a mental health professional.
  • Racial and ethnic differences were observed only for men aged 18–44.
  • Among men aged 18–44, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic men (6.1%) were less likely than non-Hispanic white men (8.5%) to report daily feelings of anxiety or depression.
  • Among men aged 18–44 who had daily feelings of anxiety or depression, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic men (26.4%) were less likely than non-Hispanic white men (45.4%) to have used mental health treatments.
  • The significant racial and ethnic disparity in treatment utilization was associated with lack of health insurance coverage.

 


Communication Disorders and Use of Intervention Services Among Children Aged 3–17 Years: United States, 2012

June 9, 2015

Increasing the proportion of children with voice, swallowing, speech, or language disorders who receive intervention services is a Healthy People 2020 goal. Timely receipt of intervention services is shown to be effective for treatment of communication disorders.

Using data from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey, this report gives the percentage of U.S. children aged 3–17 years who had communication disorders of speech, language, voice, or swallowing. Further, of those with a communication disorder, the percentage who received intervention services is also reported.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • Nearly 8% of children aged 3–17 years had a communication disorder during the past 12 months.
  • Children aged 3–6 years, boys, and non-Hispanic black children were more likely than other children to have had any communication disorder.
  • Approximately 55% of children aged 3–17 years who had any communication disorder received an intervention service during the past 12 months.
  • Among those with any communication disorder, younger children, boys, and non-Hispanic white children were more likely than other children to receive an intervention service for their disorder.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,639 other followers