PODCAST: Alcohol Deaths on the Rise and Suicide Declines

March 18, 2022

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/podcasts/2022/20220318/20220318.htm

HOST:  The month of March is often associated with St. Patrick’s Day, which for some is also an occasion of heavy alcohol use.  NCHS has historically collected data on various health behaviors, including alcohol use, and since the arrival of the pandemic, vital statistics show that there has been a surge in alcohol-induced deaths, an increase from slightly over 39,000 deaths in 2019 to just over 49,000 deaths in 2020 – an increase of more than 25 percent.  Provisional data from 2021 show the number of alcohol-induced deaths have continued to increase, to more than 52,000, up 34 percent from pre-pandemic levels.

Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis is another, long-term adverse consequence of alcohol abuse, and those deaths have increased during the pandemic as well, from over 44,000 deaths in 2019 to over 56,000 deaths in 2021 – an increase of more than 26 percent.  Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis became the 9th leading cause of death of all Americans in 2021, up from 11th prior to the pandemic.

Drug abuse of course is a well-documented scourge in the country, and in March, NCHS released the latest monthly provisional tally of overdose deaths in the U.S., for the one-year period ending in October 2021.  105,752 people died of drug overdoses during this stretch.  Synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl, accounted for the largest proportion of overdose deaths.

On March 17, NCHS released its latest estimates on emergency department visits in the United States from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, documenting that more than 151 million ER visits occurred in the U.S. during 2019.

Earlier in the month, NCHS released a new studypdf icon looking at births during the pandemic.  The new report shows that the decline in births appears to have slowed during the first half of 2021, compared to the second half of 2020.  The decline in births during the first half of 2021 would have been even smaller except for a large drop during the month of January.

Finally, NCHS released the latest official trend report on suicide in America.  The latest trends were presented in November in a separate report, and we talked with the author of that report, Sally Curtin, about the latest numbers:

HOST: Despite other causes of death such as drug overdoses and homicides spiking during the pandemic, your data show suicide actually declined, correct?

SALLY CURTIN: Yes that is correct. The number, just under 46,000 in 2020, was 3% lower than in 2019 and also the rate of suicide per 100,000 population was 3% lower as well.  Now, this is actually building on a decline which actually had started before COVID.  There was the first decline in almost 20 years from 2018 to 2019 in suicide – of about 2% – and that’s after an almost steady increase in suicide between about the year 2000 and 2018… it had increased by 35% during that time

HOST: Was it a surprise that suicide dropped in 2020, particularly given the historic increases in homicide and drug overdose deaths?

SALLY CURTIN: That’s a good question because we do know – there’s documented evidence – that some risk factors for suicide definitely increased during 2020.  And some of those risk factors are mental health issues such as depression, anxiety… Also, substance abuse increased during 2020 as well as job and financial stress.  And those are known risk factors for suicide.  So, people were concerned that the actual suicide deaths would increase.  But in the very first sentence of our report we say that suicide is complex and it’s a multi-faceted public health issue.  So it’s not as easy to say, “OK, these risk factors went up for this cause of death; therefore, you know, the deaths are going to go up.”  Suicide is much more complex than that.  There are, as well as risk factors there are elements of, obviously, prevention as well as intervention.  So some of those factors – prevention and intervention – were definitely going on during 2020, and so therefore it’s hard to say and I think in general suicide is just harder to predict than a lot of other causes of death.

HOST: So then would you say that (with) the fact that suicide declined two years in a row, is this officially a new trend?

SALLY CURTIN: It’s hard to say.  I mean, certainly it’s positive in that it’s not continuing to trend upward as it had been for so many years.  But also let me point out it still is historically high – the number is historically high as well as the rate.  They’re both high over the last 20 years.  They’re just a little bit lower than the peak in 2018.  But certainly having two years of declines gives you some hope that it might continue.

HOST: Your new study looked at suicide during 2020 on a monthly basis – what were some things that stood out in your analysis?

SALLY CURTIN: For the most part, in early 2020 – in January and February – the numbers were higher than in 2019.  But starting in March they went lower, and pretty much suicide numbers in 2020 were lower than in 2019 for the rest of the year, except in the month of November where they were just slightly higher.  Now what really stood out is the month of April, where the suicide number in 2020 was 14% lower than in 2019, and that was the greatest percentage difference of any month. And we typically don’t see that big of a change year over year in monthly numbers, so that stood out.  And also it changed sort of the yearly pattern of suicides in general – the month that has the lowest number tends to be in the winter or maybe late Fall but in 2020, April was the month with the lowest number

HOST: That is interesting – would you say that it’s counter-intuitive given that everyone was in lockdown and a lot of people weren’t working etc?

SALLY CURTIN: You would think so and we definitely heard that calls to suicide hotlines just, they just blew up and one study said they went up 800%.  So we do know that people were stressed, but we also know that they were reaching out a lot and so… yeah it is (a surprise) – I think most people will be surprised there was that large drop in April.  And I’ll leave it to others to really sort of explain what was going on – you know, whether everyone was just sort of in shock or if the stigma of maybe reaching out wasn’t quite what it normally is during regular times.

HOST: It looks like the data suggest that the declines were pretty much across the board.  Is that correct?

SALLY CURTIN: Well, for females that’s pretty much correct.  And I mean by race and ethnicity groups – all of the groups for females were lower in 2020 than 2019.  And the greatest percent decline was for Non-Hispanic white females.  There was actually a drop of 10%, and that decline reached statistical significance.  But even for females the declines really started at age 35 and over. For the younger females ages 10 to 34, rates were either the same or actually increased a bit.  For males, there was a mixed picture.  Non-Hispanic white males, as well as Non-Hispanic Asian males, had a decline but groups of minority males had increases.  Non-Hispanic black men had an increase in their rates… Hispanic men… as well as Non-Hispanic American Indian men… And once again, for men, the groups for which there was a decline tended to be in middle-age or older ages, starting with age 35.  It was not apparent in the young people ages 10 to 34.

HOST: The increases among Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic and any other minority group – had these increases been happening prior to 2020 as well?

SALLY CURTIN: Yes, pretty much all of these groups that saw those increases from 2019 and 2020 had been trending upward.  The difference is for white and Asian, they had also been trending upward but now they’ve turned.  So yes, it was just a continuation of a generally upward trend.

HOST: Do you have any indications that the decline in suicide is continuing in 2021?

SALLY CURTIN: So far we do not have any provisional data for 2021 and something that is brought out in the report is that we don’t typically do suicide reports with provisional data because unlike other causes of death it can take longer to get an accurate cause of death saying that it’s suicide.  An example is in the context of a drug overdose.  Often, they have to do toxicology analysis to figure out if the intent was actually suicidal or if it was just accidental.  So for that reason suicide figures tend to lag behind other causes of death and unfortunately right now we don’t have any numbers at all for 2021.

HOST: OK, well any other points to add?

SALLY CURTIN: I think just you know that the overall decline – it’s probably unexpected or for a lot of people because there were known increases in risk factors.  But to just point out once again that although there was an overall decline, this was a lot driven by what happened with the majority group, with Non-Hispanic whites who have among the highest rates and the numbers of suicide.  So the fact that Non- Hispanic white women were down 10%, Non-Hispanic white men were down 3% , it sort of drove the overall decline.  And there were some groups that just did not experience declines – in fact, they experienced increases.  In particular, Hispanic men had an increase of 5% and that did reach statistical significance, but there were also increases for Non-Hispanic black men and Non-Hispanic American Indian men.  So it is encouraging that the overall rate declined, but we certainly need to continue to be vigilant and to realize that this decline was not experienced by everyone.

HOST: Alright, thank you Sally for joining us.

SALLY CURTIN: Oh sure.  Thank you.


PODCAST – Q & A on 2020 Maternal Mortality Data

February 23, 2022

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/podcasts/2022/20220223/20220223.htm

HOST: NCHS kicked off the month of February with the latest annual report on Births in the country, using final data from 2020.  Most of the data were already reported in the provisional 2020 report last May, but there are a few topics that did not appear in that report.

For example, cigarette smoking during pregnancy.  The new report shows nearly 6% of women smoked at some point during their pregnancy in 2020, which was an 8% decline from 2019.  Multiple births in the country have dropped as well.  The twin birth rate in 2020 was down 8% from its high in 2014, and the triplet and higher order multiple birth rate was down 9% from 2019.

NCHS also updated its state-by-state life tables, using data from 2019.  The report showed Hawaii and California had the highest life expectancy of any state.  Hawaiians and Californians are expected to live nearly 81 years, according to the 2019 data.  Mississippi had the lowest life expectancy of any state – 74.4 years at birth.

Two new reports using National Health Interview Survey data from 2020 looked at variations in Health Insurance coverage by geographic and demographic factors.  The studies focused on adults between ages 18 and 64.  The geographic study showed that four states – Georgia, Florida, Texas and North Carolina – had uninsured rates among adults that were higher than the national average.  This report also showed that another four states – New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and California – had uninsured rates among adults that were lower than the national average.

Meanwhile, in the demographic report, the data show that nearly 1 in 10 or 31.6 million people of all ages were uninsured at the time of the interview. This includes 31.2 million people under age 65. Five percent of children under 18 were uninsured, and 14% of working-age adults ages 18–64. Nearly 2/3 of people under age 65 were covered by private health insurance, and over half were covered from employment-based coverage.   Four percent were covered by exchange-based coverage, a type of directly purchased coverage. Among people under age 65, about 2 out of 5 children and 1 out of 5 adults were covered by public health coverage, mainly by Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program or “CHIP.”

In other NCHS news, the February release of provisional data on drug overdose deaths in America featured improvements in the timeliness of the data.  Since the monthly releases began in September of 2017, there has been a lag of six months in the data.  However, beginning with the February 2022 release, that lag has been tightened to only four months, so this new release features data from the one-year period ending in September 2021.  The trends, however, remain the same; drug overdose deaths in the U.S. continue to rise, driven by overdoses from fentanyl and other synthetic opioids.

NCHS also updated its marriage and divorce rate tables in February.  Though NCHS hasn’t collected comprehensive statistics on marriage and divorce since the 1990’s, the Center does post annual tables both nationally and by state on the number of marriages and divorces per 1,000 population.  As in years past, Nevada had the highest marriage rate in the nation, more than twice the rate of the next highest state, Montana.  Wyoming had the highest divorce rate per 1,000 in the country, edging out Alabama.

NCHS also has a new report coming out this week showing that 1 in 10 children under age 18 live in households that had food insecurity in the past month, using data from the 2019-2020 National Health Interview Survey.  Non-Hispanic Black children and Hispanic children were more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic white children to live in households experiencing food insecurity in the past month.

Finally, NCHS released new 2020 data on maternal mortality in the U.S.  The new data show that in 2020, 861 women in the United States died of maternal causes, compared with 754 deaths in 2019.  The maternal mortality rate for 2020 was 23.8 deaths per 100,000 live births, compared with a rate of 20.1 in 2019.  The rate for non-Hispanic black women was significantly higher than for Hispanic women and non-Hispanic white women.

For several years, NCHS had paused its collection of maternal mortality statistics due to data quality issues, but the Center resumed collection of these important data in 2018, and the first data in (11 years) were released in January 2020.  At that time we had a Statcast discussion with Robert Anderson, the chief of Mortality Statistics at NCHS about the data quality issues in the past, as well as the new collection efforts.  Here is a snippet of that conversation:

V/O: “STATCAST REPLAY… JANUARY 30, 2020”

HOST: Now, with maternal mortality there’s a whole back story – can you share that with us?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Yeah, it’s sort of a long and involved process that we’ve gone through over the last decade and a half or so.  So in the past, as we’ve collected data on maternal deaths – and here we’re talking about years prior to 2003 in particular – research had shown that we tended to underestimate maternal deaths.  And so in order to address that issue, we felt that adding a checkbox item to the death certificate asking whether the decedent was pregnant or recently pregnant was a good idea.  And so we revised our standard death certificate – this is the standard that the states use to base their own state death certificates on –  we revised that to include this checkbox item.  So that was implemented in 2003 but only in a few states. Unfortunately, not all states implemented at the same time and so over the next, well, decade and a half – a little bit more than that actually – we had states implementing gradually this checkbox item and as a result that we saw increases in maternal mortality.  And it got to the point that in 2007, we decided that we couldn’t adequately interpret what was going on and so we stopped reporting maternal mortality altogether, waiting for all of the states to get onto the standard certificate at which point we planned to resume.  So the final state implemented the checkbox item in mid-year 2017, so 2018 is the first data year for which we have data from all states that is based on that checkbox.  So we decided we needed to do an evaluation though, of the data because research post 2003 showed that there were some problems with the checkbox – some errors that were evident.  And so we did this evaluation and we found indeed there were some problems and so we had to come up with a new method to code maternal mortality that would mitigate those errors.  So with the 2018 data we’re now releasing a figure that we believe reasonably represents the risk of maternal mortality in the United States.

HOST: Can we say that the maternal mortality deaths and the maternal mortality rate increased over time?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Well, we can’t really say that with any sort of certainty.  We do know that the increases that we’ve seen compared to the older data that we released, the increases that we’ve seen are largely – mostly even – due to implementation of the checkbox.  They don’t appear to be real increases.

ROBERT ANDERSON: We did an analysis based on 2015 and 2016 data.  The purpose of that particular analysis was to look at the effect of the checkbox on maternal mortality and what we found was that there was a dramatic increase in the number of maternal deaths detected as a result of using the checkbox.  And we also found that that increased very dramatically by age, so at the older ages, the checkbox increased the number of maternal deaths detected by quite a lot.

HOST: So the checkbox you feel then is giving a clearer picture of what the scope of the problem is?

ROBERT ANDERSON: I wish I could say that was the case – we feel like it is definitely allowing us to detect maternal deaths that we weren’t able to detect before.  That said, we know that there are some errors in the checkbox and we’re not entirely sure why these errors are occurring.  This is something that we’re going to be exploring over the course of the next year.  We’re trying to sort that out so we can actually correct it.  But the effect of these errors on the checkbox is that we are finding deaths to women who were not pregnant but for whom that the checkbox was checked that they were pregnant.  And some of these women are quite old actually – beyond reproductive age.

HOST: So when did you start uncovering those problems along this process?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Well, we didn’t actually discover this.  There were some states that were doing their own research on this – the state of Texas, for example, did some important research and they found errors.  CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health did some work with four states recently, that they recently published, that showed that this was the case as well.  And so we were really taking the results of that research, along with our own evaluation, to determine what was going on.

HOST: What else have you found – are there any geographic patterns that suggest maternal deaths are more prevalent in certain parts of the country?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Well, we can’t really say much about maternal mortality by state or by region. Unfortunately, we really don’t understand very well the variation in data quality from state to state. The numbers get quite small and it’s difficult to make judgments based on small numbers – the death rates, mortality rates, get to be very unstable with small numbers.

HOST: So some have been saying or arguing that the problem has been getting worse over time, that even now we don’t have a complete picture.  What would you say to that?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Well, I would agree that we don’t have a complete picture. The evidence that we’re seeing suggests that the problem isn’t really getting worse, but it doesn’t appear to be getting better either.  And that’s, uh, that’s something to be concerned about.  We have data from maternal mortality back to 1915 and we saw substantial declines – they’re really dramatic declines, we’ve seen dramatic decline since then and in recent decades the rate has been rather flat in comparison.

HOST: So one of these new reports looks at a 20 year period prior to the 2018 data. Could you talk about that?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Sure.  As part of our evaluation we did this initial study based on the 2015 and 2016 data to get a sense of the impact of the checkbox and that was based on actual data that we had, we recoded not using the checkbox and then compared it to what we had with the checkbox.  This other study was a little more involved and involves some statistical modeling, and so what we wanted to do with that study was to get a sense for what things would have looked like had all of the states implemented in 2003.  So that was the goal and so we have this trend based on these statistical modeling procedures that shows a fairly stable trend .

HOST: The second report was more focused on the years 2015 and 2016 – can you talk about that work?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Sure.  Yeah, the report based on the data years 2015 and 2016 is really an evaluation of the effect of the checkbox.  And those years were chosen because those were years for which we had data coded without the checkbox.  So we took these data, assuming no checkbox existed, and then we compared that with the data that we had that included the checkbox to get a sense for, to evaluate the effect of the checkbox on the maternal mortality.

HOST: Looking forward, are there any more initiatives underway in terms of improving this whole process and the quality of the data?

ROBERT ANDERSON: Yeah, there’s a lot of, a lot more work to do, really.  I mean, we have to understand better why these errors are occurring in the checkbox.  It may have something to do with electronic registration systems in the way they’re configured.  We’re not really sure, but what we really need to understand if we’re going to correct these errors – we really need to understand why they are occurring and so that’s something that we’ll be working on over the course of the next year.   In addition, we need to work with states and our plan is to do this, to work with states to investigate deaths to women of reproductive age to determine if a pregnancy or recent pregnancy was a factor in their death and this is this can be done using some data linkage to look in birth records and fetal death records for evidence of a pregnancy. I think we can glean a lot of information if we just, you know, take the time and effort to go and look and see.  What we have to do is, we have to work with the states to do this because they are the keeper of those records. They’re the ones that will have to do it and if we can support them in those efforts then hopefully we can get information that will feed back into the vital statistics system and provide us with better data in the future.

HOST: Robert Anderson, thank you for joining us.


Monthly Provisional Drug Overdose Counts through September 2021

February 16, 2022

NCHS has released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.  The monthly counts are released under the Vital Statistics Rapid Release program as an interactive data visualization.

Note that due to recent improvements in the timeliness of death certificate reporting, provisional estimates of drug overdose deaths will now be reported 4 months after the date of death, shortening the previous 6-month lag by 2 months (Please see the Technical Notes of the dashboard for more information). Thus, the new update today features data on the 12-month period ending in September 2021.


Monthly Provisional Drug Overdose Counts through June 2021

January 12, 2022

NCHS has released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.  The monthly counts are released under the Vital Statistics Rapid Release program as an interactive data visualization.

Findings:

  • Provisional data show that the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 20.6% from the 12 months ending in June 2020 to the 12 months ending in June 2021, from 83,992 to 101,263. 
  • The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in June 2021 (76,002) increased from 61,475 in the previous year.


Drug Overdose Deaths in the U.S. Top 100,000 Annually

November 17, 2021

Provisional data from NCHS indicate that there were an estimated 100,306 drug overdose deaths in the United States during 12-month period ending in April 2021, an increase of 28.5% from the 78,056 deaths during the same period the year before.

Read more here:

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/nchs_press_releases/2021/20211117.htm

The interactive web dashboard is available at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Monthly Provisional Drug Overdose Counts through February 2021

September 15, 2021

Monthy_Drugs_Feb21

NCHS has released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.  The monthly counts are released under the Vital Statistics Rapid Release program as an interactive data visualization.

Findings: 

  • Provisional data show that the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 30.4% from the 12 months ending in February 2020 to the 12 months ending in February 2021, from 74,234 to 96,801.
  • The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in February 2021 (72,689) increased from 52,712 in the previous year.

Drug Overdose Deaths in the U.S. Up Nearly 30% in 2020

July 14, 2021

drug_OD_2020The CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics has released full-year 2020 provisional drug overdose death data that estimates 93,331 drug overdose deaths in the United States during 2020, an increase of 29.4% from the 72,151 deaths predicted in 2019.

The data featured in an interactive web data visualization estimates overdose deaths from opioids increased from 50,963 in 2019 to 69,710 in 2020. Overdose deaths from synthetic opioids (primarily fentanyl) and psychostimulants such as methamphetamine also increased in 2020 compared to 2019. Cocaine deaths also increased in 2020, as did deaths from natural and semi-synthetic opioids (such as prescription pain medication).


PODCAST: NHANES Updates, Drug Overdose Deaths, and ER Visits From Motor Vehicle Crashes

June 18, 2021

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/podcasts/2021/20210618/20210618.htm

podcast-iconHOST:  In March of 2020, field operations for the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey – or NHANES – were halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Field operations are scheduled to restart later this summer.  But the halt in operations presented a problem, since NHANES data traditionally is released in two-year cycles in order to have a large enough sample size to be nationally representative.  Because the data collected in the cycle from 2019 thru March 2020 are ­not nationally representative, NCHS took steps to combine these “partial-cycle” data with previously released 2017–2018 data in order to produce nationally representative estimates.

This effort resulted in a new report this week that explains these “prepandemic NHANES data files,” from the period January 2017 thru March 2020, and outlines recommendations as well as limitations related to using the files.  The new report also presents prevalence estimates for selected health outcomes based on these files.

One of the health topics selected was obesity.  From January 2017 to March 2020, the data show that 1 in 5 children and adolescents in the U.S. were obese, or 19.7% of the age 2-19 population.  The report also shows that nearly half of children and adolescents – or 46% – had untreated or restored cavities in one or more of their primary or permanent teeth.

Among adults age 20 and up, the age-adjusted prevalence of obesity was more than 4 in 10, or 42%, and nearly 1 in 10 were severely obese. In addition to obesity, the new data show that diabetes prevalence among adults was nearly 15% and that nearly half of adults age 18 and over – or 45% — had hypertension.  Also, among older adults age 65 and up, complete tooth loss was present in nearly 14% of that population.

Ultimately, these new estimates are similar to those reported during the 2017-2018 cycle, but the additional year and two plus months-worth of data provide a larger sample size and thus more precise estimates.  And the release of these data mark another important milestone, in that they are the last NHANES data collected before widespread transmission of COVID-19 began in 2020.

(MUSIC BRIDGE)

HOST:  This week, the monthly provisional numbers for drug overdose deaths in the U.S. were released.  The latest round of data cover the one-year period ending in November of 2020, and show that the number of drug overdose deaths increased nearly 30% from the one-year period ending in November 2019.  Over 92,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in the year ending in November 2020, up from less than 72,000 the year before.

Three out of every four of these overdose deaths involved opioids, as the number of opioid-involved deaths topped 69,000 in this one-year period ending in November 2020, a major increase from 50,504 deaths the year before.  It’s important to note that recent trends may still be at least partially due to incomplete data.

A big factor behind the increase in overdose deaths is the continued increase in deaths involving synthetic opioids, primarily fentanyl.  But increases in deaths from other drugs are playing a major role as well.  Overdose deaths from cocaine as well as psychostimulants such as methamphetamine have shown significant increases compared to the previous year.

The next release of provisional numbers will feature full-year 2020 data for the first time.

(MUSIC BRIDGE)

HOST:  An average of 3.4 million emergency department visits occur each year due to injuries from motor vehicle crashes.  Most people who are injured or killed in motor vehicle crashes are occupants.  Studies have shown that medical care costs and productivity losses associated with motor vehicle injuries and deaths exceeded $75 billion in 2017.

Today, NCHS released a new report that presents emergency department visit rates per 1,000 for motor vehicle crashes by age, race and ethnicity, health insurance status, and census region. The data come from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, an annual, nationally representative survey of nonfederal, general, and short-stay hospitals in the United States.

The report shows that in 2017–2018, the overall ER visit rate for motor vehicle crash injuries was 5.3 visits per 1,000, and was highest among patients between ages 15 and 24.  The ER visit rate for non-Hispanic black patients was several times higher than for non-Hispanic white or Hispanic patients.

Emergency department visit rates were higher for patients who had Medicaid, no insurance, or workers’ compensation insurance as their primary expected source of payment compared with patients who had private insurance or Medicare.  The ER visit rate for motor vehicle crashes at hospitals located in the South was higher than the rates at hospitals in all other census regions of the United States.


NCHS Releases Latest Provisional Drug Overdose Data

June 16, 2021

NOV2020_Overdose

NCHS released the latest monthly preliminary counts of drug overdose deaths in the United States, covering the one-year period ending in November of 2020.  The data is now available in a web-based interactive dashboard at:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 28.9% from the 12 months ending in November 2019 to the 12 months ending in November 2020, from 70,357 to 90,722. After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 29.4% from the 12 months ending in November 2019 to the 12 months ending in November 2020, from 71,672 to 92,751.

The reported number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in November 2020 (67,574) increased from 49,488 in the previous year. The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in November 2020 (69,287) increased from 50,504 in the previous year.


NCHS Releases Latest Quarterly Provisional Mortality Data Through Full-Year 2020

June 8, 2021

NCHS has released the latest quarterly provisional mortality rates for the U.S., through full-year 2020 for most causes of death. 

Estimates are presented for 15 leading causes of death plus estimates for deaths attributed to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), drug overdose, falls for persons aged 65 and over, firearm-related injuries, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease, and homicide. 

The data is featured on an interactive web site dashboard at: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/mortality-dashboard.htm.

NCHS has also released state maps showing COVID-19 death rates for provisional quarter 4 mortality data. You can access the 12-month ending map here and quarterly map here.