Provisional Monthly Drug Overdose Deaths from September 2019 to September 2020

April 14, 2021

Provisional_Drugs_Sept2020

Today, NCHS released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 26.8% from the 12 months ending in September 2019 to the 12 months ending in September 2020, from 68,757 to 87,203.  After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 28.8% from the 12 months ending in September 2019 to the 12 months ending in September 2020, from 70,036 to 90,237. 

The reported number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in September 2020 (64,472) increased from 48,140 in the previous year. The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in September 2020 (66,813) increased from 49,125 in the previous year. Recent trends may still be partially due to incomplete data. 

 


NCHS UPDATES”STATS OF THE STATES” PAGE WITH LATEST FINAL DATA

March 26, 2021

SOS_Nav_Page

The CDC National Center for Health Statistics web page “Stats of the States” has been updated to include the latest state-based final data on selected vital statistics topics, including:

  • General fertility rates
  • Teen birth rates
  • Selected other maternal and infant health measures
  • Marriage & divorce rates
  • Leading causes of death
  • Other high profile causes of death.

The site’s map pages allow users to rank states from highest to lowest or vice versa.  This latest version of “Stats of the States” also includes two new topics:  Life expectancy by state and COVID-19 death rates by state (provisional data on a quarterly basis, through Q3 of 2020).  All death rates are adjusted for age.  Rates are featured in the maps because they best illustrate the impact of a specific measure on a particular state.

The main “Stats of the States” page can be accessed at:  https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/stats_of_the_states.htm


Drug Poisoning Mortality, by State and by Race and Ethnicity: United States, 2019

March 25, 2021

2019_drugs_state

NCHS released a Health E-Stat that provides information on drug overdose mortality by state (and the District of Columbia) and by race and ethnicity, and adds to findings from a recently published Data Brief on drug overdose death rates.

Findings: 

  • The age-adjusted rate for drug overdose deaths in the United States for 2019 was 21.6 per 100,000 standard population.
  • The five states with the highest rates were West Virginia (52.8), Delaware (48.0), District of Columbia (43.2), Ohio (38.3), and Maryland (38.2). 
  • The five states with the lowest rates were Nebraska (8.7), South Dakota (10.5), Texas (10.8),
    North Dakota (11.4), and Iowa (11.5).
  • The age-adjusted drug overdose death rate for the non-Hispanic white population in 2019 (26.2
    per 100,000 standard population) was 21.3% higher than the national rate.
  • The rate for the non-Hispanic black population (24.8) was 14.8% higher than the national rate.
  • The rate for the non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native population (30.5) was 41.2% higher than
    the national rate.
  • The rate for the non-Hispanic Asian population (3.3) was 84.7% lower than the national rate.
  • The rate for the non-Hispanic Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander population (9.5) was 56.0% lower than the national rate. The rate for the Hispanic population (12.7) was 41.2% lower than the national rate.

Provisional Monthly Drug Overdose Deaths from August 2019 to August 2020

March 17, 2021

Today, NCHS released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 25.1% from the 12 months ending in August 2019 to the 12 months ending in August 2020, from 68,371 to 85,516. 

After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 26.8% from the 12 months ending in August 2019 to the 12 months ending in August 2020, from 69,640 to 88,295. 

The reported number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in August 2020 (62,972) increased from 47,772 in the previous year. The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in August 2020 (65,030) increased from 48,747 in the previous year.

Recent trends may still be partially due to incomplete data. The reported and predicted number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids (excluding methadone; T40.4) and psychostimulants with abuse potential (T43.6) continued to increase compared to the previous year. Both reported and predicted overdose deaths involving cocaine increased compared to the previous year. The reported and predicted number of natural and semi-synthetic opioid deaths also increased compared to the previous year.


Urban-Rural Differences in Drug Overdose Death Rates, 1999-2019

March 17, 2021

Questions for Holly Hedegaard, Health Statistician and Lead Author of “Urban-Rural Differences in Drug Overdose Death Rates, 1999-2019.”

Q: How do drug overdose death rates in urban and rural areas compare?

HH: Over the past 20 years, rates of drug overdose deaths have increased in both urban and rural areas. Rates in rural areas were higher than in urban areas from 2007 through 2015, but in 2016 that pattern changed. From 2016 through 2019, rates have been higher in urban areas than in rural areas.

Although urban rates are higher than rural rates nationally, for 5 states (California, Connecticut, North Carolina, Vermont, and Virginia), rates are higher in rural areas than in urban areas.


Q: Is this the most recent data you have on this topic?  When do you plan on releasing 2020 data?

HH: Final 2020 data won’t be released until the end of 2021. In the interim, monthly provisional estimates of drug overdose death rates are available at https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Q: Was there a specific finding in the data that surprised you from this report?

HH: In this report, we looked at trends in rates for drug overdose deaths involving certain types of opioids, including natural and semisynthetic opioids. This group includes such drugs as hydrocodone, oxycodone, and codeine – drugs that are often thought of as prescription opioids. In looking at the trends from 1999 through 2019, the rates of drug overdose deaths involving natural and semisynthetic opioids were higher in rural than in urban areas from 2004 through 2017, but in 2018 and 2019, the urban and rural rates were similar, because of a decline in the rates in rural areas. We will continue to monitor whether this decline in the rate continues.


Q: What is the take home message for this report?

HH: The key messages from this report are: 1) for the past 20 years, drug overdose death rates have increased in both urban and rural areas, and 2) there are urban-rural differences in the rates of drug overdose deaths involving specific types of drugs. For example, for the past 20 years, rates of drug overdose deaths involving cocaine or heroin have been consistently higher in urban areas than in rural areas. In contrast, in recent years, rates of drug overdose deaths involving psychostimulants (such as methamphetamine) have been higher in rural areas than in urban areas.


Q: Do you think rural counties will go back to having higher drug overdose death rates in the future?

HH: It’s impossible to predict what will happen in the future. While a lot of resources have been devoted to prevention and treatment of drug overdose in recent years, new drugs are becoming available all the time. NCHS will continue to monitor drug overdose deaths to identify patterns to help inform public health efforts.


Provisional Monthly Drug Overdose Deaths from July 2019 to July 2020

February 17, 2021

On Wednesday (February 17) NCHS released the next set of monthly provisional drug overdose death counts.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 22.8% from the 12 months ending in July 2019 to the 12 months ending in July 2020, from  68,023 to  83,544.  After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 24.2% from the 12 months ending in July 2019 to the 12 months ending in July 2020, from 69,266 to  86,001.

The reported number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in July 2020 (61,297) increased from 47,474 in the previous year. The predicted number of opioid-involved drug overdose deaths in the United States for the 12-month period ending in July 2020 (63,129) increased from 48,429 in the previous year. Recent trends may still be partially due to incomplete data.

The reported and predicted number of drug overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids (excluding methadone; T40.4) and psychostimulants with abuse potential (T43.6) continued to increase compared to the previous year. Both reported and predicted overdose deaths involving cocaine increased compared to the previous year. The reported and predicted number of natural and semi-synthetic opioid deaths also increased compared to the previous year


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru June 2020)

January 14, 2021

 

NCHS released the latest monthly provisional data on drug overdose deaths in America on Wednesday.  This release covers the one-year period ending in June of 2020, and the impact of the pandemic on drug abuse in the country is reflected in the new numbers.

Provisional data show that the reported number of drug overdose deaths occurring in the United States increased by 19.5% from the 12 months ending in June 2019 to the 12 months ending in June 2020, from 67,787 to 81,003.  After adjustments for delayed reporting, the predicted number of drug overdose deaths showed an increase of 21.3% from the 12 months ending in June 2019 to the 12 months ending in June 2020, from 68,711 to 83,335.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm

 


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru December 2019)

July 15, 2020

 

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


Provisional Drug Overdose Death Counts (thru November 2019)

June 17, 2020

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Drug Overdose Death Rates by State — United States, 2018

April 17, 2020

In 2018, 23 states and DC had drug overdose death rates that were higher than the national rate of 20.7 per 100,000.

Except for Arizona and New Mexico, states with higher rates were in the eastern part of the country, including the two states with the highest rates: West Virginia (51.5) and Delaware (43.8). Twenty-four states had rates that were lower than the national rate; the states with the lowest rates were Nebraska (7.4) and South Dakota (6.9).

Three states (Illinois, Nevada, and Utah) had rates that were not statistically different from the national rate.

Source: National Center for Health Statistics, National Vital Statistics System, Mortality Data. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6915a5.htm