Hypertension-related Mortality in the United States, 2000–2013

March 26, 2015

Hypertension is a chronic condition that can lead to heart disease, stroke, and other diseases that can result in premature death. Reducing the number of persons in the population with hypertension is one of the objectives of Healthy People 2020.

Using national multiple cause-of-death data files from the National Vital Statistics System, a new NCHS report presents trends in hypertension-related mortality for 2000–2013 by selected demographic characteristics and the underlying causes of hypertension-related death. Hypertension-related mortality is defined by any mention of hypertension on the death certificate. Because about 2% of all decedents with hypertension reported on the death certificate were under age 45, only decedents aged 45 and over were included in this analysis.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • The age-adjusted hypertension-related death rate increased 23.1%, whereas the rate for all other causes combined decreased 21.0% from 2000 through 2013.
  • Rates for hypertension-related death increased for both sexes aged 45–64 and 85 and over from 2000 through 2013.
  • The age-adjusted hypertension-related death rate increased for all Hispanic origin and race groups examined from 2000 through 2005. Since then, the rate for the non-Hispanic white population continued to increase, whereas the rate for the non-Hispanic black population decreased.
  • Although the age-adjusted hypertension-related death rate for the non-Hispanic black population was higher than for the non-Hispanic white and Hispanic populations throughout the period, the gap between them narrowed.

 

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Drug-poisoning Deaths Involving Heroin: United States, 2000–2013

March 4, 2015

Drug poisoning (overdose) is the number one cause of injury-related death in the United States, with 43,982 deaths occurring in 2013. While much attention has been given to deaths involving opioid analgesics, in recent years there has been a steady increase in the number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin. A recent study using data from 28 states reported that the death rate for heroin overdose doubled from 2010 through 2012.

Using data from the National Vital Statistics System, a new NCHS report provides a description of trends and demographics for heroin-related drug-poisoning deaths in the United States from 2000 through 2013.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin nearly quadrupled from 0.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2000 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 in 2013. Most of the increase occurred after 2010.
  • The number of drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin was nearly four times higher for men (6,525 deaths) than women (1,732 deaths) in 2013.
  • In 2000, non-Hispanic black persons aged 45–64 had the highest rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin (2.0 per 100,000). In 2013, non-Hispanic white persons aged 18–44 had the highest rate (7.0 per 100,000).
  • From 2000 through 2013, the age-adjusted rate for drug-poisoning deaths involving heroin increased for all regions of the country, with the greatest increase seen in the Midwest.

 


Cervical Health Awareness Month

January 30, 2015

This month is Cervical Health Awareness Month.  Cervical cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death among U.S. women.  From 1999-2013, there were 60,378 deaths from cervical cancer with 4,217 deaths in 2013.  The age-adjusted death rate per 100,000 for U.S. women dropped from 2.8 in 1999 to 2.3 in 2013.

The cervical death rate for non-Hispanic black females was nearly double the rate for non-Hispanic white females and  higher than the rate for Hispanic females.

From 1999 to 2013, cervical cancer death rates have decreased 31% for Hispanic females, 26% for non-Hispanic black females, and 16% for non-Hispanic white females.

In 2010, there were 29.4 million physician office visits during which Pap tests were ordered or provided.

More information on cervical cancer can be found below:

http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6402a4.htm


QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Rates of Death from Fire or Flames by State — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2007–2011

October 20, 2014

During 2007–2011, age-adjusted rates for deaths from fire and flames varied widely by state, ranging from 0.3 per 100,000 population in Hawaii to 2.9 in Mississippi. In 18 states and the District of Columbia, the age-adjusted death rate was significantly higher than the overall U.S. rate of 1.0 per 100,000 population.

Rates were higher than the U.S. rate in most of the southeastern states. In addition to Mississippi, the states with the highest death rates were Alaska (2.1), Alabama (2.0), Arkansas (2.0), and Oklahoma (2.0). The six states with the lowest death rates were Hawaii (0.3), Massachusetts (0.5), Arizona (0.6), California (0.6), Colorado (0.6), and Utah (0.6).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6341a9.htm


QuickStats: Drug-Poisoning Death Rates by State

July 10, 2014

In 2011, age-adjusted rates for deaths from drug poisoning varied by state, ranging from 7.1 to 36.3 per 100,000 population. In 17 states, the age-adjusted drug-poisoning death rate was significantly higher than the overall U.S. rate of 13.2 deaths per 100,000 population. The five states with the highest poisoning death rates were West Virginia (36.3), New Mexico (26.3), Kentucky (25.0), Nevada (22.8), and Utah (19.5).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6326a7.htm