Differences in Stroke Mortality Among Adults Aged 45 and Over: United States, 2010–2013

July 8, 2015

Despite steady decreases in U.S. stroke mortality over the past several decades, stroke remained the fourth leading cause of death during 2010–2012 and the fifth leading cause in 2013.

Most studies have focused on the excess mortality experienced by black persons compared with white persons and by residents of the southeastern states, referred to as the Stroke Belt. Few stroke mortality studies have focused on Asian or Pacific Islander and Hispanic persons or have explored urban–rural differences.

A new NCHS report provides updated information about stroke mortality among U.S. residents aged 45 and over during 2010–2013 by age, race and ethnicity, income,  urban–rural residence, and residence inside or outside the Stroke Belt.

Key Findings from the Report:

  • During 2010–2013, the age-adjusted stroke death rate for non-Hispanic black men aged 45 and over (154.8 deaths per 100,000 population) was 54% to 68% higher than the rates for men of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups. The rate for non-Hispanic black women aged 45 and over was 30% to 61% higher than the rates for women of the same age in other race-ethnicity groups.
  • The age distribution of stroke deaths differed by race and ethnicity.
  • Stroke death rates were 32% higher in counties in the lowest median household income quartile than in counties in the highest income quartile.
  • Nonmetropolitan counties had higher stroke death rates than counties at other urbanization levels.
  • Stroke mortality inside and outside the Stroke Belt differed by race and ethnicity.

 

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QuickStats: Age-Adjusted Rates of Death from Fire or Flames by State — National Vital Statistics System, United States, 2007–2011

October 20, 2014

During 2007–2011, age-adjusted rates for deaths from fire and flames varied widely by state, ranging from 0.3 per 100,000 population in Hawaii to 2.9 in Mississippi. In 18 states and the District of Columbia, the age-adjusted death rate was significantly higher than the overall U.S. rate of 1.0 per 100,000 population.

Rates were higher than the U.S. rate in most of the southeastern states. In addition to Mississippi, the states with the highest death rates were Alaska (2.1), Alabama (2.0), Arkansas (2.0), and Oklahoma (2.0). The six states with the lowest death rates were Hawaii (0.3), Massachusetts (0.5), Arizona (0.6), California (0.6), Colorado (0.6), and Utah (0.6).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6341a9.htm


QuickStats: Drug-Poisoning Death Rates by State

July 10, 2014

In 2011, age-adjusted rates for deaths from drug poisoning varied by state, ranging from 7.1 to 36.3 per 100,000 population. In 17 states, the age-adjusted drug-poisoning death rate was significantly higher than the overall U.S. rate of 13.2 deaths per 100,000 population. The five states with the highest poisoning death rates were West Virginia (36.3), New Mexico (26.3), Kentucky (25.0), Nevada (22.8), and Utah (19.5).

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6326a7.htm


How does your state fare when it comes to death rates from flu and pneumonia?

September 16, 2009

Age-adjusted death Rates for influenza and pneumonia, 2006

Age-adjusted death rates shown here are deaths per 100,000 population.

To learn more, visit www.cdc.gov/nchs/deaths.htm.